UAV Systems Development - Challenges for ISTAR Support

DSEi 2011 - Events to be staged in the Robotics and Unmanned Systems Showcase

‘UAV Systems Development - Challenges for ISTAR Support' is the title of a briefing to be given by Cranfield University's Professor Ian Poll. Cranfield Aerospace, a wholly owned subsidiary of the university, has a growing capability in the field of Unmanned Air Systems (UAS), with a proven track record in the development of innovative systems. From 11:45 to 12:30, Tues 13 Sept.


Under the heading ‘UAV Hangars in Harsh Climes' Sprung Instant Structures's International Sales Manager, Jonathon Fenton, will report on a climate controlled hangar for one of the largest UAVs in operation which has been installed in one of the hottest places on the planet. From 14:00 to 14:30, Tues 13 Sept.

Accumulating flight hours faster than any other mid-endurance UAV System, Insitu's ScanEagle UAS is also the most employable, with a mission-readiness record exceeding 99 per cent. In Sustaining Scan Eagle's 500,000 Flight Hours - the Future of Unmanned Missions, Insitu's International Business Development Director Steve Tanner reviews this impressive capability between 14:45 and 15:15, Tues 13 Sept.

A demonstration entitled ‘Foot Patrol in Afghanistan' featuring unmanned air and ground systems, will be staged twice daily at 10:30 and 15:30.

The Robotics and Unmanned Systems Showcase is located in the north west corner of the North Halls - nearest entrance N3.

For information on other seminars happening during DSEi visit http://goo.gl/Hmy3z.

These seminars are open to registered attendees of DSEi 2011. To register visit www.dsei.co.uk/register

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Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.