ROSCon 2012 preliminary program now available and registration open

19-20 May 2012 (immediately following ICRA) St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

ROSCon 2012 is a chance for ROS developers of all levels, beginner to expert, to spend an extraordinary weekend learning from and networking with the ROS community. Get tips and tricks from experts, network, and share ideas with fellow developers from around the globe.


ROSCon is a developers' conference, in the model of PyCon and BoostCon. The two-day program will comprise tech talks and tutorials that will introduce you to new tools and libraries, and teach you more about the ones you already know.

We received an overwhelming number of session proposals, which made for some tough decisions in the review process, and an acceptance rate of 27%. The program includes in-depth coverage of fundamentals, like tf and URDF, and introductions to higher-level concepts, like motion planning and multi-robot systems. We'll also hear about interesting applications of ROS, from teaching to field robotics. And we have two excellent keynotes, from Morgan Quigley of Stanford (and original author of ROS) and Julia M. Badger of NASA JSC.

We have some great sponsors to thank: Bosch, Motoman, Clearpath, Heartland, Willow Garage, CoroWare, Schunk, and Yujin. We're excited to have such strong industry support!

Registration is now open at roscon.ros.org.

Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.