Microscan Presents Webinar on ID and Inspection in Packaging

Microscan, a global technology leader in barcode, machine vision and lighting solutions, announces that it will host an educational webinar titled "ID and Inspection from Can to Carton" - an exploration of the role of barcode (or auto ID) and machine vision technology in food and beverage packaging.

RENTON, WA, November 6, 2012 - Microscan, a global technology leader in barcode, machine vision and lighting solutions, announces that it will host an educational webinar titled "ID and Inspection from Can to Carton" - an exploration of the role of barcode (or auto ID) and machine vision technology in food and beverage packaging. The presentation and live question and answer session are free to attend, and will take place during two live web broadcasts: November 14 at 10 A.M. PST (Seattle) / 1 P.M. EST (Boston) and November 15 at 4 P.M. CET (Amsterdam) / 10 A.M. EST (Boston).


Packaging operations are becoming more sophisticated. Today's automated, intelligent processes rely on the transfer of data from the factory floor to centralized systems that help manufacturers achieve a number of objectives, from improving product quality, to ensuring regulatory compliance, to achieving supply chain visibility. In this webinar, follow a can of green beans from seamer to pallet on its journey through an automated packaging process. The webinar tours a food and beverage packaging line, stopping at key inspection points to observe how automation solutions like machine vision and barcode technologies help manufacturers meet important quality requirements while improving overall production efficiency. After the presentation, live audience question and answer sessions with presenter Mike Dietzel will identify applications for auto ID and inspection in real automated packaging processes.

Webinar presenter Mike Dietzel, Solutions Engineer on Microscan's industry-focused packaging team, has over 15 years experience developing solutions for packaging industries ranging from single laser barcode readers to multi-camera machine vision installations requiring unique lighting solutions.

To register for the November 14 or 15 session of "ID and Inspection from Can to Carton," visit http://www.microscan.com/TrainingAndResources/Webinars/WebinarPckgFBCan.aspx.

About Microscan
Microscan is a global leader in technology for precision data acquisition and control solutions serving a wide range of automation and OEM applications. Founded in 1982, Microscan has a strong history of technology innovation that includes the invention of the first laser diode barcode scanner and the 2D symbology, Data Matrix. Today, Microscan remains a technology leader in automatic identification and machine vision with extensive solutions for ID tracking, traceability and inspection ranging from basic barcode reading up to complex machine vision inspection, identification, and measurement.

As an ISO 9001:2008 certified company recognized for quality leadership in the U.S., Microscan is known and trusted by customers worldwide as a provider of quality, high precision products. Microscan is a Spectris company.

Microscan Contact
Corporate Headquarters, U.S.
Shaina Warner, Marketing Coordinator
+1 425-203-4963; swarner@microscan.com

###

Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.