Pack Expo 2013: Rinco calls pouch-sealing technology a 'game changer'

Rinco's technology allows for seals anywhere from 2 to 25 mm

Las Vegas-Rinco Ultrasonics is well-versed in the design and manufacture of ultrasonic bonding and cutting machinery to weld plastic components and to cut food products. But a few years back, the company asked itself: Why not get into flexible packaging?


"We saw an opportunity in flexible where we can do [seal technology] better," Gordon Hull, managing director of Rinco Ultrasonics, told PlasticsToday. "We believe we have created a new market for pouches."

Hull said that Rinco's PPS0145 film-sealing technology has significantly expanded what is possible in ultrasonic film sealing. The technology permits seal patterns with a greater surface area and allows the production of contour-shaped seals, as opposed to the more traditional straight-line seals. The seals can take almost any configuration, which Hull said is a key way for brand owners to differentiate their products from the competition. This patented seal geometry also eliminated any film or pouch slipping.

At Pack Expo (Sept. 23-35; Las Vegas), Rinco showcased some of the companies utilizing its pouch-sealing technology, including beverage-giant Gatorade as well as the startup FrozenPeaz, which produces flexible packs for hot and cold therapy to relieve pain and assist in recovery from minor injuries or post-surgery rehabilitation.

Rinco's technology allows for seals anywhere from 2 to 25 mm. In addition, the ultrasonic seals don't require follow-up heat sealing, which can expand the amount of applications that use the material.

Rinco has determined that its interlocking pattern can provide a 20% stronger bond compared to other ultrasonic seals. To further enhance the aesthetics of the bond, Rinco has recently developed the ability to emboss a design or logo into the seal area. Designs and logos are achieved by simply relieving an area of the seal pattern.

"We can weld almost anything-synthetic oil, cheese, liquid food, fish oil-what have you," Hull said.

Rinco announced the company has expanded its line of FPA series ultrasonic pouch-sealing systems. The new FPA 4500-T model, which features seal bonding of pouches up to 155-mm wide, has several upgrades including a single access panel for easier serviceability and a wash down resistant coating. The FPA 4500-T has an IP67 rating and meets food-contact regulations.

Another improvement to the machine is the reduction in the overall width of the unit down to 7.73 inches compared to the previous 11-inch width.

The FPA series actuators are designed specifically for the packaging industry as a drop-in retrofit to convert healing sealing stations to ultrasonic sealing stations. Rinco manufactures the FPA 4500-T, and other FPA series ultrasonic pouch-sealing systems, at its Danbury, CT facility.

"Customers, like big Fortune 500 companies, are now coming to us to learn about the pouch-sealing technology," Hull said. "If I sound excited, it's because I am-this is one of the most exciting technologies I've been a part of."

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