OWL Nano Achieves 100 Nanometer Resolution in Desktop 3D Printing

New product makes ultra-precision 3D printing an affordable tool for every designer or dedicated hobbyist

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va., Jan. 8, 2014 -- Old World Laboratories today announced the availability of its newest 3D printer, the OWL Nano. With resolution 100x thinner than other desktop 3D printers in the $2,000 - $5,000 price range, the OWL Nano makes ultra-precision 3D printing an affordable tool for every designer or draftsperson, prosumer or dedicated hobbyist.


"The OWL Nano offers the accuracy and reliability of significantly more expensive, larger machines," said Nicholas Liverman, partner, Old World Laboratories. "It's the ideal tool for anyone looking to create high-value, low-volume products or molds. If you can dream it, the OWL Nano can build it with incredible precision."

OWL Nano's leap in resolution and accuracy stems from its next-generation stereolithography technology. Unlike other stereolithographic printers, which bounce a laser beam off mirrors before it reaches the object being printed, the OWL Nano positions its laser source just centimeters from the structure. This decreases beam distortion and allows the highly tuned, single strand laser to focus on an area as small as 100 nanometers. The OWL Nano's laser also maintains a perfect perpendicular position below the object it is forming, which creates a more balanced 3D print.

With greater efficiencies, the printer operates quietly and fits in any workspace. The OWL Nano also minimizes fumes - eliminating the need for additional room ventilation - and helps stabilize operating temperature. Product features include:

Printing technology:
Stereolithography (SLA)

Layer Resolution:
100 nanometers

Build Volume:
288 in3 (6L x 6W x 8H in)
4,500,000 mm3 (150L x 150W x 200H mm)

Weight:
45 lbs

Power:
1.4 A, 120 V

Build Temperature:
72 - 77 F

Build Materials:
Acrylate, Photopolymer Resin

Software:
Netfabb, Marlin Filmare (included)

O.S. Compatibility:
Mac, Windows, Linux

Travel Case:
Pelican (included)

OWL Nano desktop 3D printers are manufactured in the USA in Hampton Roads, Virginia. The printers are designed for easy transport with zero disruption to the printer's resolution. Its size, aesthetics and quiet operation make it appropriate for almost any setting: in an office or lab, on a manufacturing floor or in a home environment.

For more on OWL Nano's benefits and pricing, visit oldworldlabs.com or call 800-282-0386.

"3D printing holds great promise for industrial, consumer and artistic endeavors," said Liverman. "The OWL Nano makes 3D printing more widely accessible for any organization or individual seeking powerful design and production solutions that are extremely precise and accurate."

About Old World Laboratories

Founded in 2013, Old World Laboratories is revolutionizing how engineers, medical professionals, educators, hobbyists and designers of all kinds create and produce. With its transformative OWL Nano printer, Old World Laboratories provides a powerful, but affordable, 3D printer that anyone with a computer and an idea can use to make art, design products and craft solutions.

CONTACT: Michael Nelson, PadillaCRT, mike.nelson@padillacrt.com, 703-894-5460

Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.