KOMET and SCHUNK Synergy

Komet and Schunk honed in on their Synergy and held a joint distributor event last week at Komet of America's facility in Schaumburg, Illinois.

Pairing precision workholding and toolholding with precision cutting tools is a logical step for making the best parts in the most productive way. With that in mind, KOMET, a leading global manufacturer for bore machining, reaming, and threading, and SCHUNK, the worldwide competence leader for clamping technology and gripping systems, honed in on their Synergy and held a joint distributor event on April 9, 2014 at KOMET of America's facility in Schaumburg, Illinois.


The 5-hour event consisted of morning presentations of products that were shown working together seamlessly in the afternoon in the machining center on the production floor. Three demos were displayed on the machining center using SCHUNK workholding and toolholding with KOMET cutting tools. All types of workpieces and various materials such as cast iron and aluminum were machined, boasting the depth of KOMET tools as well as the variety of clamping technology available from SCHUNK, offering a wide array of flexibility. SCHUNK looks forward to more joint events that benefit not only joint distributors, but customers as well.

About SCHUNK: SCHUNK is the worldwide competence leader for clamping technology and gripping systems. Totaling more than 60 years of experience, SCHUNK is a family owned operation and a global player in one. For more information, visit www.schunk.com

Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.