Autonomous Technology to be Presented at the SmartAmerica Challenge Summit

- Applied Robotics for Installations and Base Operations (ARIBO) will be

highlighted at the SmartAmerica Challenge Summit, June 11, at the Walter E.
Washington Convention Center.

- The summit is a culmination of a challenge aimed at uniting more than 100
organizations who dared to demonstrate the potential benefits of
cyber-physical systems (CPS) technology, programs and test beds to improve
safety, sustainability, efficiency, mobility and overall quality of life.

- Team ARIBO is a model of public-private partnership and cross-sector
collaboration. ARIBO partners include: The U.S. Army Tank Automotive
Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), Stanford University,
Induct Technologies, Unicor (through Induct), University of Texas Arlington
Research Institute (UTARI), West Point, Fort Bragg & Womack Army Medical
Center, and Comet Consulting.

Media are invited to attend the SmartAmerica Challenge Summit. Registration
is required. Go to:
http://smartamerica.org/teams/autonomous-robotics-for-installation-and-base-
operations-aribo/.

Contact Lori Grein at: lori.a.grein.civ@mail.mil or call 586-215-9907 for
interview opportunities with ARIBO partners.

Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.