STRATASYS 2015 EXTREME REDESIGN 3D PRINTING CHALLENGE IS NOW ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS

First place winner in post-secondary category will win trip to 3D printing conference

Minneapolis & Rehovot, Israel - Sept. 16, 2014 - Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, is now accepting submissions to the 11th annual Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge.


Open to students worldwide, this annual 3D printing challenge invites students in engineering, design and art or architecture to create a new product that improves how a task is accomplished or to redesign an existing product. Entries should be mechanically sound, realistic and achievable, and are judged based on:

· Sound mechanical design and part integrity

· Compelling description (written and/or video)

· Design creativity

· Product usefulness

· Aesthetics (art or architecture category)

Individual students or two-person teams are required to create designs using 3D CAD software and to submit their design files in .STL format to Stratasys online, along with a written description and/or a 30-second video explaining the value and benefit of the Extreme Redesign model. The deadline to submit entries is Feb. 11, 2015. Categories include:

· Engineering: Secondary Education (middle and high school)

· Engineering: Post-Secondary (university, college or post-secondary)

· Art or architecture (any grade level)

New this year, the first-place student winner in the post-secondary category will win a trip to a 3D printing/additive manufacturing conference in 2015 (location to be determined). First-place winners in every category will receive $2,500 (US dollars) scholarships, and the instructor of the first-place student will receive a demo 3D printer for a limited time to use in the classroom. Second and third place winners will receive $1,000 (US dollars) scholarships. The top-10 entries in each category will receive a Stratasys apparel item (value up to $50) and regional semi-finalists will receive a 3D printed model of their design. Each person who enters will receive an official Extreme Redesign T-shirt.

For more information about Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge and contest rules, visit the Extreme Redesign page on Stratasys' website. Plus, follow Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge on Facebook.

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Rehovot, Israel, is a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive and additive manufacturing solutions. The company's patented FDM®, PolyJet™ and WDM™ 3D Printing technologies produce prototypes and manufactured goods directly from 3D CAD files or other 3D content. Systems include 3D printers for idea development, prototyping and direct digital manufacturing. Stratasys subsidiaries include MakerBot and Solidscape, and the company operates a digital-manufacturing service comprising RedEye, Harvest Technologies and Solid Concepts. Stratasys has more than 2,500 employees, holds over 600 granted or pending additive manufacturing patents globally, and has received more than 25 awards for its technology and leadership. Online at: www.stratasys.com or http://blog.stratasys.com

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