Kickstarter - STEM Toy TROBO Raises Over $60,000 in Kickstarter Campaign

TROBO is a huggable stuffed robot toy and storytelling app that answers kids’ questions about the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) around them.

ORLANDO, Fla. - TROBO the Storytelling Robot successfully raised $61,060 in a Kickstarter campaign that ended on October 6th.


Created by two dads, Jeremy Scheinberg and Chris Harden, TROBO is a huggable stuffed robot toy and storytelling app that answers kids' questions about the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) around them. Stories concepts - which were voted on by Kickstarter backers - include: How is Honey Made (Chemistry), What is Lightning (Weather), What is Gravity (Physics), How do I Count Money (Math) and How Does a Car Go (Engineering)?

The plush storytelling robot, TROBO, uses an interactive storytelling iPad app to read personalized stories out loud to children ages 2 - 7.

TROBO's crowdfunding campaign will allow the product to go into production for delivery in 2015.

Image removed by sender."We are so grateful for all of the support we have seen from our backers," said Scheinberg. "They love TROBO so much and helped us cross the Kickstarter finish line."

"We are so excited to bring this product out, not just for our backers but for kids everywhere," said Harden. "There is so much amazing science in the world around us that we want to share with children."

TROBO is still accepting pre-orders at www.TROBOkickstarter.com.

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