Dremel Fuels Maker Movement in Education With Advanced 3D Printer

Debuting as the brand’s first device for education, the Dremel 3D Idea Builder empowers students to master key STEM concepts through hands-on learning and creativity

A common challenge when educators are asked to use a new device is understanding its practical classroom application. Dremel, a trusted manufacturer of tools for life and learning, today announced a 3D printer designed to support teachers and demystify 3D printing technology in the classroom. The Dremel 3D Idea Builder marks Dremel's first foray into the education market, extending the reliable brand's reach from workshop to classroom.

The Dremel 3D Idea Builder is made specifically for education, with easy-to-use software and lesson plans. Written by interdisciplinary curriculum experts, the 3D printer's comprehensive teaching and learning kits integrate with existing STEM curriculum. To help teachers while they implement 3D printing, 1:1 customer support and training are available via phone, Skype, online chat and email.
"Because classroom technology continues to evolve, we wanted to provide students with a tool that truly captures their limitless potential," said George Velez, Manager, Dremel 3D Education. "Paired with support and resources that help teachers integrate the technology into their instruction, the Dremel 3D Idea Builder can spark students' interest in important STEM concepts."

Sixty-five percent of today's K-12 students will enter jobs and careers that do not yet exist, according to a U.S. Department of Labor report. To prepare students for the future career landscape, the Dremel 3D Idea Builder nurtures their confidence to explore, create and solve problems.

The 3D printer enables students to design and build their own digital models and then interact with their models in the physical space - ultimately enhancing retention of abstract concepts. Dremel supports this endeavor by providing 10 curriculum-based lesson plans and 3D model kits designed specifically for exploring STEM education with the nuances of 3D printing.

Easy and safe to use, the Dremel 3D Idea Builder features a fully enclosed workspace to ensure clean building conditions in classrooms. The printer's reduced noise quality minimizes distractions while printing.

To learn more about the Dremel 3D Idea Builder and its capabilities, visit https://3dprinter.dremel.com/. To learn about its curriculum resources, visit https://3dprinter.dremel.com/education/.

About Dremel
Founded in 1934, Dremel is the industry standard in leadership and excellence for versatile tools systems. The Dremel 3D Idea Builder expands the brand's reach from the workshop to the classroom to provide educators and students with cutting-edge technology for STEM education. Built upon the brand's dedication to empowering makers through creativity, precision and project enjoyment, the Dremel 3D Idea Builder nurtures student confidence by giving them a tool to design and build their own models to understand lessons. With available curriculum to draw connections between 3D printing and instruction, Dremel is providing educators with the support they need to transform classrooms. Learn more about classroom applications and curriculum-based learning at 3dprinter.dremel.com.

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