On Cyber Monday, Friendly Robots Are Helping Smaller Stores Chase Amazon

DAVEY ALBA for Wired:  Locus Robotics is an offshoot of Massachusetts-based Quiet Logistics, a third-party order fulfillment company that gets merchandise out the door for big apparel retailers like Zara, Gilt Groupe, and Bonobos. And the idea behind its bots isn’t just to replace humans, but to create a system where everyone can work together more efficiently.
What most people don’t realize in the age of push-button shopping is the “shopping” part doesn’t disappear. You the consumer are no longer at the store doing the physical work of tracking down the thing you want. But somebody still has to do it. For e-commerce, that task typically falls to a worker at a distribution center who must locate the product, make sure it’s not damaged, and send it off to be packed and shipped. This can be grueling, tedious work. More than anything else, it’s about walking. Lots of walking. Locus aims to have its bots do the walking instead.  Cont'd...
 

Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

Stäubli – Robotic tool changers

Stäubli - Robotic tool changers

Stäubli offers a complete range of robotic tool changing systems for payloads of 20 kg to 1,530 kg and torsion moments from 30 to 12,500 Nm, designed for use in virtually every industry. The tool changers adapt to customer-specific applications with different modules for media, data, power, etc. The new MPS 130 robotic tool changer is powerful, very robust, and designed for a huge range of applications. It features multiple couplings for air/vacuum connections, and can be equipped with connectors for data and electrical transmission. Very compact dimensions, with a coupled height of only 67 mm, make the MPS 130 the first choice for applications requiring a high number of mating cycles.