Insect-Sized Drone Will Spy On Terrorists

Source - Sky News:  An insect-sized spy drone with four flapping wings and four legs is set to become Britain's latest weapon in the war on terror.

The Dragonfly drone fits in the palm of a hand and has four flapping wings and four legs.

It can fly through the air with great agility, allowing it to penetrate buildings through open windows, and perch on surfaces to eavesdrop.

It can detect incoming objects and buildings, meaning it can avoid obstacles at high speeds.

It is one of a number of pieces of kit being developed by the Ministry of Defence as part of an innovation drive.  Cont'd...

Is That Drone a Weapon?

Many police departments have purchased or plan to buy drones for search-and-rescue, arson, disaster relief, and accident investigations. Police officials say the devices can keep officers out of dangerous situations and cover more ground quickly, especially in the case of a missing child or an armed suspect on the run, especially in rural areas.

The Third Offset Must Update Asimov's Laws of Robotics

JG Randall for The National Interest:  Things tend to happen in threes. An unlikely triumvirate on the surface, it would appear that Asimov’s laws on robotics and the UN Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW) will outflank the Third Offset—the nation’s search for its next silver bullet in war fighting is robotics—knowing that many nations will agree on moral grounds. These nations will reject Asimov based on semantics, and though the debate might be perceived as strictly academic, or even rhetorical, it is worth discussing for the sake of a good cautionary tale. Because, whether we like it or not, killer bots are coming to a theater of operation near you.

Before we get deep in the weeds, let’s get some clarity. First, let’s outline Asimov’s robotic laws. The Three Laws of Robotics are a set of rules devised by the science fiction author Isaac Asimov. They were introduced in his 1942 short story “Runaround,” although they had been foreshadowed in earlier stories.  Cont'd...

The New Police Arsenal - Robots

Bomb robots were designed to help detonate and remove Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), not to deliver payloads. But the Dallas police improvised and attached a bomb delivery system to the robot.

The Unmanned Platform Common Control System (CCS)

The CCS prototype was developed for the U.S. government and its goal is to simultaneously control multiple unmanned assets in various environments (water, air and ground).

Air Force Research Lab Uses TORC's Robotic Conversion Kits for Robotic Assault-Zone Survey Vehicle

TORC's unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) conversion kits, which maintain the ability for optionally manned operation, offer the proven capabilities and modularity necessary for AFRL to scale from one prototype to production quantity.

UAV Positioning and Communications

While today's technology is highly advanced and offers sufficient end user applications, there is room for advancement in both the areas of research in the current technology as well as new and unique solutions in applications that have not been tried before.

The Unmanned Systems Industry

Overall the unmanned systems industry is healthy and growing, even in this fiscal climate. Commercial applications of unmanned systems in mining, agriculture, and health care continues to grow, as the robustness and maturity of unmanned systems increases.

Unmanned Systems

Smart phones and new apps will dramatically improve the way unmanned systems distribute and deliver situational awareness to our troops while at the same time significantly reducing the command and control costs of unmanned systems.

Magneto-Inductive Communication: Interview with Steve Parsons, Ultra Electronics

To validate and demonstrate our Through-the-Earth capability, we developed a full-duplex MI Modem (MIM-1000) and installed it on a Pioneer 3-AT R&D robot. Initial field trials were carried out at an abandoned coal mine in Nova Scotia, Canada, where we successfully demonstrated the robot - we call her "Maggie" - being driven and maneuvered remotely by an operator located on the mine's surface with Maggie located in an underground mine shaft separated by over 100 feet of geological overburden.

Cars Are The New UGVs

Will today's developers of military UGVs be tomorrow's manufacturers of autonomous civilian cars? Probably not. However, it is clear that the technologies developed for one will be adapted for another.

Galil DMC-4080 Helps Guide Remote Controlled Vehicle Used in Hyper-Realistic Military Training

STOPS engineers found the native Galil programming language easy-to-use, which helped enable them to incorporate several safety routines into the operating system. For example, whenever the controller does not receive a data stream, it goes into a fail-safe routine that brings the vehicle to a stop.

Silvus Demonstrates Robot Repeater Capability on TALON & FasTac

Silvus Technologies demonstrated its MIMO radio repeater capability integrated into QinetiQ's TALON and iRobot's FasTac robots at the Army Expeditionary Warfighters Experiment (AEWE) Spiral G. TARDEC's Ground Vehicle Robotics group requested Silvus to integrate its SC3500 MIMO radio into both robotic platforms as part of TARDEC's ISR Mission Concepts platform.

QinetiQ Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robots

QinetiQ is primarily focused on the defense and security markets today; however, we are seeing growing interest in robotics for the agricultural and mining industries where robotics can provide more efficient operations in harsh environments.

Silvus SC3500 MIMO Radio Delivers 16 Mbps Bidirectional Link to Bomb Squad Taurus Robot

Advanced wireless capabilities have not been available to bomb squads, who have had to rely on a tethered approach, until now. With Silvus' cutting edge MIMO radios, EOD UGV operators can now wirelessly examine suspicious objects with 3D HD video and haptic feedback precision from safe NLOS distances of a few hundred meters.

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