Precision Drones for Structural Inspection

PRENAV's drones take photographs from precise locations in close proximity to structures, and those photos are then used to build an accurate 3D reconstruction of the asset.

Hello World. PRENAV Releases Video of the World's Most Precise Commercial Drone System

Bay Area Startup Snags $1.2M in Seed Funding to Develop a Precision Drone System with Centimeter-Level Accuracy for Infrastructure Inspection

Hawk Aerial Introduces the CropHawk350 Solution for Agricultural Industry

Solution includes options for drone purchase, periodic crop monitoring and reporting

Why being able to 3-D print glass objects is such a big deal

By Dominic Basulto for the Washington Post:  Researchers at MIT have just unveiled the ability to 3-D-print beautiful glass objects. While humanity has been forming, blowing and molding glass objects for more than 4,500 years, this is the first time that a 3-D printer has been used to process glass from a molten state to an annealed product. Obviously, there are some purely aesthetic applications here, as in the potential for epic blown glass art. Think museum-worthy glass objects worthy of Dale Chihuly. In fact, the MIT team — a collaborative team of researchers that includes the MIT Media Lab’s Mediated Matter group, the MIT Glass Lab and MIT’s Mechanical Engineering Department — plan to display a few of their beautiful objects at an upcoming exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in 2016.  But the applications go beyond just beautiful new designs that might be created via 3-D printers one day. As the MIT research team points out in a forthcoming paper for the journal 3-D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, “As designers learn to utilize this new freedom in glass manufacturing it is expected that a whole range of novel applications will be discovered.” That’s the real future potential of glass 3-D printing — the ability to create objects and applications that do not exist today.   Cont'd...

Here comes the drone backlash

Mike Elgan for Computer World:  Consumer drone technology is barely taking off, and already a harsh public backlash is growing. Your typical garden variety consumer drone is lightweight, battery operated, has four propellers and is controlled by a smartphone. Most have cameras and beam back live video, which can be recorded for posterity. Some have high-quality HD cameras on them, and from that high vantage point can take stunning photos and videos. Drones are fun. They're exciting. They're accessible. But increasingly, they're becoming unacceptable. I'm sensing a growing backlash, a kind of social media pitchfork mob against drones and drone fans. It's only a matter of time, and not much time, before it will be politically incorrect to express any kind of enthusiasm for drones in polite company. I fear that many are about to embark on an "everybody knows drones are bad" mentality that will suppress the nascent industry and spoil this innovative and exhilarating technology. Here's what's driving the coming backlash:   Cont'd...

NASA to Discuss First Drone Delivery at Logistics Summit

Emerging technologies will take center stage when speakers from NASA and Indiana State University address logistics leaders at the 13th annual Indiana Logistics Summit on Tuesday, Sept. 22, at the Indiana Convention Center. Unmanned systems, which include drones and robots, will be a primary theme for presentations by Frank Jones, Associate Director for Research Services Directorate at the NASA Langley Research Center and Dr. Richard Baker, director of Indiana State University's new Center for Unmanned Systems.

International Drone Expo and Business Conference Announces IDE 2015 Drone Pitchfest

The second International Drone Expo (IDE) and Drone Business Conference, the largest global commercial drone gathering today announced the IDE 2015 Drone Pitchfest, a once in a lifetime opportunity for drone entrepreneurs to get in front of the most influential venture capitalists dominating the powerful drone community with $150,000 of funding to be won.

InterDrone Las Vegas Welcomes Leading Venture Capitalists to Program. Accel Partners to Sponsor Start-Up Zone

Largest North American Drone Conference Creates Dynamic Environment Called The Hangar for Start-Ups to Connect With Leading Funding Companies; Adjoins Main Expo Hall, Includes Targeted Panel Sessions

Hendrix Consulting Group Granted FAA Section 333 Exemption to Operate UAS

The Federal Aviation Administration Grants Section 333 Exemption Status and a Certificate of Authorization to Hendrix Consulting Group, an aerial imaging solutions company.

DJI Releases Photography and Video Drone Designed for Beginner Pilots

DJI Phantom 3 Standard makes aerial imaging more accessible than ever before -- Includes intelligent flight functions that make cinematic shots easy to capture -- Integrated HD camera records video up to 2.7k -- Available for purchase today at US$799

Drone World Releases Phantom 3 Bundle Pro Upgrade Kit

The leading Phantom 3 kit retailer adds a professional-level Phantom 3 bundle to their line-up of exclusive drone kits.

The Hague to Host European Trade Fair on Drones

The exposition is expected to attract 2,500 international visitors.

Tayzu Robotics and Verizon Wireless Partner to make Large Scale Data Collection and Monetization from a UAV a Reality

Aerial drone developer Tayzu Robotics, through their Verizon Partnership Program (VPP), has integrated new technology into their Tayzu crafts. This advanced networking technology will enable Tayzu Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to collect large amounts of data from autonomous UAV flights via the Verizon Cellular Network.

New Website DroneLaw.Pro Focuses on the Use of Drones & FAA Regulations

Traverse Legal, PLC has recently launched its new website regarding Section 333 Exemptions and the use of drones (UAS/UAV) for commercial use under FAA regulations.

Why Drones are Ditching their DIY Roots

By AINSLEY O'CONNELL for FastCompany:  When hobbyist drone pilot Michael Kolowich ordered his Cinestar-8 octocopter in 2013, he traveled from Boston to Montana, where it had been assembled, to pick it up. "I went up there for four days of training in how to fly it safely, how to get great shots with it, the ins and outs of the platform," he says. "It really did take that much training to get the most out of it." How the world has changed in just two years. "Almost every serious video drone then was somewhat custom-built," he says. Now, for a fraction of what Kolowich paid, aspiring drone pilots can pick up a "serious" drone at their local Best Buy. The drone community, circa 2015, is at an inflection point, with DIY tinkering giving way to mass-market distribution. "A year or two ago it was far more custom builds. Now you see it standardizing quite a bit," says Dan Burton, CEO and cofounder of Dronebase, an online platform for booking commercial drone services. Burton was first introduced to drones while serving in the Marines; after returning to the U.S. and attending business school, he began helping commercial drone pilots manage their financials. Dronebase, which effectively allows pilots to outsource their sales and operations, is a natural extension of that hands-on experience. Burton describes the drone community as comprised of "very passionate hobbyists." But increasingly, the community’s creative, maker mindset is directed toward the cinematics of operating the drone camera, rather than toward the construction of the flying robot itself.   Cont'd...

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Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.