Fastener Customers Reject 3D Printers for Future Supplies, says FMW Fasteners

Customers are fairly clear they do not see 3D printers as a viable option to produce their future supplies.

Protomatic Now Offers 3D Printing

Protomatic, located in Dexter, MI, announces the offering of 3D metal printed parts to complement its existing offering of precision CNC machining services. 3D printing (additive manufacturing) serves as a bridge between prototyping and production, to close the chasm of lead time until receipt of final casted parts.

3D Printing and Technology Fund Adds Robotics to the Mix

BY BRIAN KRASSENSTEIN for 3DPrint.com:  There are several ways one can diversify their holdings within any market. An investor could simply research which firms are out there within a particular industry, like the 3D printing industry, and invest small amounts into each by purchasing shares. The easiest way, however, would be to find a fund that’s going to do all the work for you, managed by someone who likely has more experience in the market than you do.  There is currently only one main fund which concentrates their efforts primarily on the 3D printing space, the 3D Printing and Technology Fund (TDPNX), managed by CEO Alan M. Meckler, and his son John M. Meckler.  While the fund is currently down approximately 13% YTD, it has outperformed the two largest pure play 3D printing stocks, 3D Systems (NYSE:DDD) and Stratasys (NASDAQ:SSYS), significantly. 3D Systems is down over 44% on the year, and Stratasys down a staggering 58.5%. Today the fund is making a major change, one that the Mecklers feel should increase opportunity for investors. Up until this point, the fund allocated at least 80% of their capital to what they defined as ‘3D printing companies’ and ‘technology companies’. Today this changed, along with the fund’s official name. The fund’s new name will now be ‘3D Printing, Robotics and Technology Fund,’ while going forward 80% of their capital will now be allocated to what they define as ‘3D printing companies,’ ‘robotics companies’ and ‘technology companies.’   Cont'd...

MakerBot Expands 3D Printer Sales to All Sam's Club Locations Nationwide

MakerBot Replicator Mini Works Well for Office, Classroom or Home

SME's WESTEC Keynote Explores the Impact of Manufacturing on Hollywood

Legacy Effects' Jason Lopes will discuss how 3D printing is changing the film industry

Triptech Plastics Announces Unmatched Resin for 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing

Amphora offers 3D printers the strength and durability they need.

Stratasys Strengthens Its Position and Commitment to German Speaking Region

Acquires RTC Rapid Technologies to better support partners and customers in the region

Dubai to Build World's First 3D Printed Office

The project marks the beginning of an important transformation in the construction and design sector; the shift to 3D printing and digital fabrication.

The all-new Cura WITH ALL-NEW FEATURES

Cura has been completely reengineered from the ground up for an even more seamless integration between hardware, software and materials.

MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer Wins Red Dot Design Award

MakerBot Replicator Among Winners Chosen Out of Almost 5,000 Entries for 2015 Red Dot Award for Product Design

Could This Machine Push 3-D Printing into the Manufacturing Big Leagues?

Neil Hopkinson, a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, has been developing the new method, called high-speed sintering, for over a decade.  Laser sintering machines build objects by using a single-point laser to melt and fuse thin layers of powdered polymer, one by one. Hopkinson replaced the laser system, which is both expensive and slow, with an infrared lamp and an ink-jet print head. The print head rapidly and precisely delivers patterns of radiation-absorbing material to the powder bed. Subsequently exposing the powder to infrared light melts and fuses the powder into patterns, and the machine creates thin layers, one by one—similar to the way laser sintering works, but much faster. Hopkinson’s group has already shown that the method works at a relatively small scale. They’ve also calculated that, given a large enough building area, high-speed sintering is “on the order of 100 times faster” than laser sintering certain kinds of parts, and that it can be cost competitive with injection molding for making millions of small, complex parts at a time, says Hopkinson. Now the group will actually build the machine, using funding from the British government and a few industrial partners.  Cont'd...

DUNWOODY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATES STRATASYS' ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY INTO ITS CURRICULUM

Technical college adds additive manufacturing certificate program

More Than a 3D Printing Pen - 3DSimo Mini Is The Ultimate Creator's Tool

Reaching 490 degrees C, The Mini Is The Hottest Pen On The Market and Starts at $89

Dassault Systèmes and Safran Enter Strategic Partnership for Additive Manufacturing

End-to-End Digital Continuity for the Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Engine Parts

STRATASYS SUCCESSFULLY DEFENDS VALIDITY OF FDM PATENTS

U.S. Patent Trial and Appeal Board denies Afinia's attempts to challenge validity of Stratasys IP

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