Ingestible origami robot

MIT News via Larry Hardesty for RoboHub:  In experiments involving a simulation of the human esophagus and stomach, researchers at MIT, the University of Sheffield, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have demonstrated a tiny origami robot that can unfold itself from a swallowed capsule and, steered by external magnetic fields, crawl across the stomach wall to remove a swallowed button battery or patch a wound.

The new work, which the researchers are presenting this week at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, builds on a long sequence of papers on origamirobots from the research group of Daniela Rus, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.  Cont'd...

Zora, The First Social Robot Already Widely Used In Healthcare

Controlled via a tablet by health professionals, Zora can lead a physical therapy class, read out TV programmes, weather forecasts or local news.

The New Family Member: A Robotic Caregiver

The issue of nursing care in an ageing society is a major social concern and will continue to be so. Therefore, we can expect to see robotic devices become the caregivers of the future.

RE2 Robotics Partners with University of Texas Arlington to Develop Robotic Nursing Assistant

RE2's robotic manipulator arms will serve as the brawn for the robotic nursing assistant to aid patients and reduce on-the-job injuries suffered by nurses during lifting and maneuvering patients.

A Vision for the Future: Baxter Shines in Research to Guide the Blind

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's TechBridgeWorld Group Use Collaborative Robot Technology to Enhance Navigation in Urban Settings

Medrobotics Corporation Receives FDA Clearance to Market Flex® Robotic System

Company Initiates U.S. Launch of the Flex Robotic System for Transoral Procedures in the Mouth and Throat

Panasonic Autonomous Delivery Robots - HOSPI - Aid Hospital Operations at Changi General Hospital in Singapore

"To deliver the best patient care with passion and empathy"

Paralyzed man can now use his mind to shake hands, drink beer using robotic arm

A man paralyzed by gunshot more than a decade ago can shake hands, drink beer and play "rock, paper, scissors" by controlling a robotic arm with his thoughts, researchers reported.
 
Two years ago, doctors in California implanted a pair of tiny chips into the brain of Erik Sorto that decoded his thoughts to move the free-standing robotic arm. The 34-year-old has been working with researchers and occupational therapists to practice and fine-tune his movements.
 
It's the latest attempt at creating mind-controlled prosthetics to help disabled people gain more independence. In the last decade, several people outfitted with brain implants have used their minds to control a computer cursor or steer prosthetic limbs.   Full Article:

How Will 3D Printing Revolutionize Medicine?

3-D printing could really change medical research. Important questions can be answered, saving both time and money, as 3-D-printed models give surgeons new perspectives and opportunities to practice, and patients and their families a deeper understanding of complex procedures.

Revolve Robotics Demonstrates Easy Telepresence Integrations with Telemedicine Ecosystem Leaders

Revolve Robotics to Demo Integrated Solutions including GeriJoy, JACO, Plantronics, swyMed, and Vidyo at ATA Booth #2226

Revolve Robotics and swyMed Team to Deliver Secure, HIPAA-Compliant Robotic Telepresence for Telemedicine. See It at swyMed's HIMSS Booth #7164

Revolve Robotics, a leading innovator in robotic telepresence, today announced seamless integration between its innovative Kubi robotic telepresence platform and an innovative telemedicine video communications client from swyMed via Revolve's Application Programming Interface (API) and Software Development Kit (SDK). Together, these two solutions combine to deliver video collaboration with real-time patient data for remote experts, while also enabling those remote consultants to independently engage and "look around" the remote site in order to better assess the patient.

Revolve Robotics & JACO Expand Integration to Create New, Advanced Telemedicine Solutions; See it at JACO's HIMSS Booth #4712

Revolve Robotics, a leading innovator in robotic telepresence, today announced seamless integration between its innovative Kubi robotic telepresence platform and JACO, a leading manufacturer of mobile computer carts for the healthcare industry. Together, their combined solutions deliver multiple new options for hospitals, physicians, psychiatrists, and other healthcare professionals looking for a mobile platform to deliver engaging, productive telemedicine.

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Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.