General Dynamics Mission Systems Acquires Bluefin Robotics

General Dynamics Mission Systems has acquired Bluefin Robotics, a manufacturer of unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) that perform a wide range of missions for the U.S. military and commercial customers.

FAIRFAX, Va. - General Dynamics Mission Systems has acquired Bluefin Robotics, a manufacturer of unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) that perform a wide range of missions for the U.S. military and commercial customers.


"Bluefin's advanced underwater technologies and products are perfectly aligned with our expertise in undersea system integration," said Chris Marzilli, president of General Dynamics Mission Systems. "We have long specialized in many of the technologies that are making UUVs increasingly effective, and have strong credentials integrating UUVs into naval platforms. With the added capability to design and manufacture UUVs, combined with our commitment to speeding innovation to our customers, this acquisition positions us well to further support our U.S. Navy customers."

Bluefin Robotics will become part of General Dynamics Mission Systems' Maritime and Strategic Systems line of business. The value of the transaction has not been disclosed.

General Dynamics Mission Systems, a business unit of General Dynamics, designs, manufactures and delivers command and control systems, operational hardware, trusted and secure communications and cyber systems to customers within the U.S. Department of Defense, the intelligence community, federal and civilian agencies, and to international customers. For more information about General Dynamics Mission Systems, please visit gdmissionsystems.com and follow us on Twitter @GDMS.

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