NASA, BP and the UK Ministry of Defence confirmed for the Commercial UAV Show

Now in its 4th year The Commercial UAV Show has released the full conference agenda which includes contributions from NASA, BP and the UK Ministry of Defence.

Now in its 4th year The Commercial UAV Show has released the full conference agenda which includes contributions from NASA, BP and the UK Ministry of Defence.


Marcus Johnson, Research Aerospace Engineer, Aviation Systems Division, at the NASA Ames Research Center is discussing developing an autonomous ATM system and defining the future of the drone industry.

Joe Little, Technology Principal, at BP plc is giving a snapshot view into how UAVs have revolutionised the oil industry.

Al Cunningham, Project Engineer for Watchkeeper Unmanned Air System, at the UK Ministry of Defence is offering insights into building the case for the safe use of UAS in international airspace.

The Commercial UAV Show is two events: a world-class conference focused on the progression of the UAV industry; and, a technology exhibition showcasing the latest hardware and software innovations from the mega tech companies to the latest start-ups.

The Show takes place 15-16 November at the ExCel in London.

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