Robots May Help Defuse Demographic Time Bomb in Japan, Germany

Anirban Nag for Bloomberg: Robots to offset negative impact of slower labor force growth. Emerging markets won't be so lucky, Moody's report says

Dual-Arm Collaborative Robots Increase Flexibility and Accuracy

James Anderton for Engineering.com: Robotics are an ideal technology for fine assembly tasks, such as those in the electronics industry.

Collaborative robotics at the Automate and ProMat trade shows

Collaborative robots need safe, sensitive and flexible end-of-arm-tooling (EOAT) and there were many vendors - and some breakthrough technologies - demonstrated at the two shows.

How Robotics Will Change the Food Industry

Quora via Forbes: I think we'll see this across industries where basic tasks that can be easily automated eventually will be, and it will pave the way for a workforce that is more productive and efficient.

Report: Cyberattacks on Industrial Robots

Trend Micro recently released the first in-depth, hands-on research that demonstrates the extent to which industrial robots can be compromised.

The Not-So-Secret Code That Powers Robots Around the Globe

Ellen Huet for Bloomberg: A Silicon Valley startup is the guardian of the building blocks of robot life.

Teaching robots to teach other robots

Adam Conner-Simons, CSAIL via MIT News: CSAIL approach allows robots to learn a wider range of tasks using some basic knowledge and a single demo.

Amazon Selects Finalists to Compete at the Amazon Robotics Challenge Event in Japan This Summer

The Amazon Robotics Challenge will award up to $250,000 in prizes and encourages idea sharing and innovation within the robotics and automation community

The changing landscape of mobility as seen at Automate and ProMat

Retailers and logistics companies have been opening facilities at a record pace and in this fast-paced world, warehousing and logistics managers are looking for robotics solutions to remain competitive.

This Map Shows Where Robots Are Coming for Your Job

By Mira Rojanasakul and Peter Coy for Bloomberg: Are you about to be replaced by a robot? The question has broad implications for the U.S. economy, especially the manufacturing sector.

How to Tell Category Data Cables Apart

The category positively correlates with the data speed. I.E. the higher the category, the higher the possible frequency and the higher the frequency, the higher the possible data rate.

Veo Robotics gives industrial robots a sixth sense for safely working around people

Devin Coldewey for TechCrunch: Everyone knows the robots are coming, so we should probably get to work figuring out how we can coexist. That's the mission of Veo Robotics, which is working on a system that gives robots spatial awareness of every object in their reach.

Have Robotics Stocks Gotten Too Hot?

Michael Kahn for Barron's: With the sector soaring, we found two smaller players - Cognex and Mazor Robotics - to keep an eye on.

This Company Has Created the Swiss Army Knife of Robots

Leigh Buchanan Editor-at-large, Inc. magazine: Industrial robots typically sell for $75,000 or more, a significant capital outlay. And that price tag escalates dramatically with operational costs. Ready Robotics, a startup housed in City Garage, a Baltimore center for makers, charges $1,500 to $4,000 a month for use of one of its robots, called the TaskMate.

Festo Hannover Messe Pre Show Preview

Excellent Videos of five things to look for at Festo's Hannover Messe booth - BionicCobot, BionicMotionRobot, OctopusGripper, Motion Terminal, SupraMotion

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Industrial Robotics - Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.