Hamilton Collaborate with Macherey-Nagel to Create Automated Liquid Handling Workstation

Hamilton has collaborated with kit manufacturer MACHEREY-NAGEL® to create the Genomic STARletâ„¢, an automated liquid handling workstation that extracts nucleic acids from biological samples and purifies PCR products in a non-IVD environment.

Just one instrument can run up to eight pre-installed protocols and accommodate different input samples, including bacterial, eukaryotic cells, tissue, blood, plants and others.


More than a dozen nucleic acid MACHEREY-NAGEL kits have been tested on the instrument, which processes 96 samples in 60-144 minutes depending on the kit, enabling several runs to be performed each day.

The instrument package includes easy-to-use software with an intuitive user interface for easy MACHEREY-NAGEL Vacuum protocol selection. In addition, unlike other systems, the operator can easily switch protocols.

The Genomic STARlet uses the same precision instrumentation as other Hamilton instruments and features real-time clot detection, uses no aerosols due to forceless tip pickup and ejection technology (CO-RE) and minimizes contamination risks with unique features like Anti-Droplet Control (ADC) design.

The hardware also saves space with an integrated, small-footprint vacuum system, and the CO-RE Gripper provides fast and convenient on-deck transport.

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Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.