Schunk - RVK “Collect and Place”

The RVK allows for lower cycle times and fewer transport strokes in a pick & place system.

The RVK has a revolving head which allows for easy application of a "Collect & Place" principle by being able to collect several workpieces before transferring them.


The gripper in the working position can be operated independently from the other grippers, which remain in the gripped state when not in use.

The RVK allows for lower cycle times and fewer transport strokes in a pick & place system and because of its integrated valve technology, fewer valves are required as well. It can be used in clean to slightly contaminated environments such as assembly or packaging areas, or wherever fast cycles are required.

Integrated electric feed-through allow all of the grippers to be continuously monitored leading to high process reliability. The RVK can be easily mounted to the ERS 135, 170, or the RST-D 087 from SCHUNK. It can also be adapted to mount on other rotary units, such as another rotary module or a robot arm, as long as there is a through-bore available.

Standard adapter plates allow the use of various grippers as well as the ability to externally or internally grip workpieces.

Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.