Dexmo Robotics has created a mechanical exoskeleton glove for VR use

Julia Alexander for Polygon:  With HTC Vive and Oculus Rift headsets, the first wave of mainstream, consumer VR has officially arrived, and with it, comes the question of how to constantly better the experience for those using it. As it stands right now, those who want to use devices like the Vive or Rift must do so with controllers; the Rift uses an Xbox One controller while the Vive comes with its own dedicated peripheral. Both are functional and serve their purpose, but they come with certain limitations when trying to achieve the ideal VR experience. Now, Dexmo Robotics has unveiled what it thinks will solve some of those frustrations: a mechanical exoskeleton glove that can be paired with VR headsets. The glove, which can be seen in the video above, provides 11 degrees of freedom for movement, and the company touts the fact that each finger comes with a pressured sensor. Essentially, if you're playing a first-person shooter, you'll be able to feel the in-game gun's trigger bring squeezed as well as the recoil.   Full Article:

DENSO to Advance Artificial Intelligence Knowledge, Signs Technical Advisory Contract with Carnegie Mellon University Professor Takeo Kanade

Through this contract, DENSO is looking to advance its artificial intelligence technology and expand its engineering expertise in the areas of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), autonomous drive, and the Internet of Things (IoT).

See what this squishy octopus-inspired robot can do

The latest revolutionary robot isn’t the metallic, costly machine you’d expect: It’s squishy like Silly Putty, wireless, battery-less and made for pennies by a 3D printer. Meet Octobot. It looks like a tiny octopus and is designed to mimic that slithery creature to get through cracks and tight places, making it ideal as a rescue robot. A team at Harvard University has created a robot - actually about 300 of them, since they are so cheap to make - that is opposite of the common view of a robot. Soft, not hard. Flexibl,e not rigid. It’s not mechanical, nor electrical. It’s powered by fluids. The discovery is described, photographed and shown on video in the scientific journal Nature.   Cont'd...

Collaboration and Integration are Crucial for the Growth of the Robotics Industry

The advancement of robotics will happen more quickly and provide more value with collaboration in the community around the adoption of reasonable interoperability standards.

Eric the Robot - the Start of the Inevitable Future of Humans and Robots Living Harmoniously

In this evolving environment, can trainable robots and cobots go from tradeshow wow factor to actual industrial automation standard components, or will they go the way of Eric and be lost because the industry was too slow to take advantage of the available technology?

Prototype Robot to Cull Invasive Lionfish Tested in North Atlantic

Robots In Service of the Environment (RISE) joined deep ocean research charity, Nekton, on its maiden voyage in the North Atlantic to test a prototype being developed to operate remotely in deep water to locate and deliver a fatal electric shock to the invasive species.

Mantaro Introduces the MantaroBot TeleTrak Telepresence Robot for Rugged Industrial, Manufacturing, and Construction Environments

New product with robust mobility expands market for mobile telepresence.

Teachers College to Host Global Human-Robot Collaboration Experts for IEEE's 25th International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2016)

From a boot camp for teachers using virtual reality as learning tools to the robotic seal "PARO," that provides animal assisted therapy, some of the freshest innovations and most sophisticated minds in robotics will be present at Teachers College, Columbia University, as it becomes the first graduate school of education to host the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)'s 25th International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2016), August 26-31, 525 West 120th Street, Manhattan, New York City.

What is an Electroadhesive Clutch?

The electroadhesive clutch is a general-purpose clutch for exoskeletons, offering increased functionality while being lightweight and consuming very little energy.

Seegrid Secures $25M in Additional Financing

Funding will support continued rapid growth

One Step Closer to the Seafloor - New Underwater Robotic Vehicle Tested in Guam

Schmidt Ocean Institute brings the Ocean to the public through its latest underwater vehicle SuBastian.

Inside 3D Printing and RoboUniverse Join with IFA Berlin to Host 3DPrinting@home and Robot@home; September 4-7, 2016

The 3DPrinting@home and Robot@home expo takes place within IFA Global Markets, an exhibition which focuses on the B2B2C and retail channels. In addition to consumer and retail 3D printers and robots, other cutting-edge exhibitor groups from around the globe will be on display within IFA Global Markets. IFA attracts over 249,000 visitors, 60% of whom are from the channel.

Robot Octopus Points the Way to Soft Robotics With Eight Wiggly Arms

Cecilia Laschi for IEEE Spectrum:  The sun was sparkling on the Mediterranean Sea on the afternoon when a graduate student from my lab tossed our prize robot into the water for the first time. I watched nervously as our electronic creation sank beneath the waves. But the bot didn’t falter: When we gave it the command to swim, it filled its expandable mantle with water, then jetted out the fluid to shoot forward. When we ordered it to crawl, it stiffened its eight floppy arms in sequence to push itself along the sandy bottom and over scattered rocks. And when we instructed it to explore a tight space beneath the dock, the robot inserted its soft body into the narrow gap without difficulty. As a professor at the BioRobotics Institute at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, in Pisa, Italy, I lead a team investigating soft robotics. This relatively new field of research has the potential to upend our ideas about what robots are capable of and where they can be useful. I chose to build robots that mimic the form of the octopus for two reasons. First, because they’re well suited to demonstrate the many advantages that come when a machine can flex and squish as needed. Also, it’s an excellent engineering challenge: An octopus with eight wiggly arms, which must work together in the face of complex hydrodynamic forces, is very difficult to design and control.   Cont'd...

With Human Emotion Recognition AI, MJI's Communication Robot Tapia Can Now Understand Your Emotion

MJI adoptes Smartmedical's Empath, a vocal emotion recognition technology

Virtual Reality, BattleBots® and Much More Take over Minneapolis September 21-22

Largest co-located Medical Design & Manufacturing (MD&M) and Embedded Systems Conference (ESC) Bring Together the Latest Tech in Robotics, Virtual Reality, and Medtech

Records 556 to 570 of 1830

First | Previous | Next | Last

Personal & Service Robots - Featured Product

ST Robotics - R17HS-6, the 6-axis version of the high speed R17 variant

ST Robotics - R17HS-6, the 6-axis version of the high speed R17 variant

The 6-axis version of the R17HS high speed variant of the R17 robot is now available. As is our policy the 6th axis is an optional bolt-on module. At the same time we have made it even faster and new software eliminates shake and greatly improves repeatability as this video shows. Please see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wG0MeiJ-yE. The video would seem to imply a repeatability of 0.01mm but we are sticking with 0.2mm in the spec. The motor specialist was able to tune the motors from the other side of the pond. My first reaction when we put power on and entered the first commands was to jump back in amazement (and maybe an expletive). Tip speed is now 3m/s; that's 3 times as fast as its nearest competitor yet costs half the price. I love it when a plan comes together.