9 IoT Robotic Products Are Ready to be Introduced in the Market in Japan

The Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) supports the creation of ventures by young researchers / College students in IOT and Robotics. This year Nine teams with product ideas on IoT and four teams on robotics were selected for 2017 government funding.

IoT and Robotics Invent the Future in Kandy, myDevices and Collaborizm Hackathon

Winners of global virtual hackathon announced

Icon Labs Provides IoT Security Guide Whitepaper

A Guide to Security Requirements for Various Classes of IoT Devices and Systems

Echoing Government's Productivity 4.0, IoT Automation Boosts Taiwan's Competitiveness

Facing challenges of labor shortages and aging labor forces, Taiwan's Ministry of Economic Affairs is implementing "Productivity 4.0" to stimulate economic growth and upgrade industries.

Interview with Mark G. Knebusch of Softing: Mainstreaming The Internet of Things

The idea of many connected devices helping better control the factory floor is not new. IoT in one sense is merely a shift to internet addressable devices versus those either addressed by proprietary means or just "dumb".

Onion.io invents "The Invention Platform For The Internet Of Things" with the Onion Omega

Onion, with the unveiling of Onion Omega, aims to radically simplify and democratize the hardware prototyping and development process for the Internet of Things (IoT).

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Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.