MOTOMAN ROBOTICS INTRODUCES NEW 3D RECOGNITION VISION SOLUTION

MotoSight 3D CortexVision, simplifies the use of 3D vision in robotic guidance applications. This powerful vision solution functions very similar to the human visual process. It is ideal for machine loading, product sortation and welding applications.

MotoSight 3D CortexVision can learn a large number of objects and recognize any of the identified objects regardless of presentation within the visual field of the camera. Within a second, the vision process can identify the part in front of the camera and where it is located. Even complex parts can be identified and then placed accurately.


Minimal downtime is required to train new parts due to its simple point-and-click programming interface. New parts can be trained in seconds, while other systems take minutes or hours to train parts in 3D space. No calibration is required due to advanced algorithm and unique recognition of patterns programmed. Using a single 2D camera (GigE technology), MotoSight 3D CortexVision returns object position information in six degrees of freedom (X, Y, Z, roll, pitch and yaw) without the use of structured lighting. This is an evolutional change in which a single camera can be utilized to provide a 3D solution. Accuracy within +/- 0.5 mm can be achieved with additional inspections.

About Motoman Robotics Division
Founded in 1989, the Motoman Robotics Division of Yaskawa America, Inc. has grown to become the second largest robotics company in the Americas with an installed based of more than 30,000 units. Its products include robotic automation solutions for virtually every industry and robotic application, including arc welding, assembly, coating, dispensing, material handling, material cutting, material removal and spot welding operations.

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ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

The ST Robotics Workspace Sentry robot and area safety system are based on a small module that sends an infrared beam across the workspace. If the user puts his hand (or any other object) in the workspace, the robot stops using programmable emergency deceleration. Each module has three beams at different angles and the distance a beam reaches is adjustable. Two or more modules can be daisy chained to watch a wider area. "A robot that is tuned to stop on impact may not be safe. Robots where the trip torque can be set at low thresholds are too slow for any practical industrial application. The best system is where the work area has proximity detectors so the robot stops before impact and that is the approach ST Robotics has taken," states President and CEO of ST Robotics David Sands.