New 3D Video Tele-prescence For Oculus Rift or other 3D Goggles

The Transporter3D is a real time video converter designed to interface the Oculus Rift with live video. This makes it the ideal Oculus Rift-FPV device. It is fully configurable to adapt with almost any camera and provides the realtime performance required for interactive tele-prescence.

The Transporter3D is a real time video converter designed to interface the Oculus Rift with live video. This makes it the ideal Oculus Rift-FPV device. It is fully configurable to adapt with almost any camera and provides the realtime performance required for interactive tele-prescence.


EMR Laboratories is now crowd sourcing the final design. This is your chance to be heard - help shape the Transporter3D and be part of the developers circle by providing insight into the final design features. We want the Transporter3D to be a product of the FPV community. We've already figured out the hard stuff. Now is the time for your input into the features that would make the Transporter3D your ultimate FPV experience.

What does the Transporter3D design currently look like?

The hardware accepts standard definition composite video inputs (CVBS) and generates realtime video output over HDMI that is designed for the Oculus Rift.
There are two video inputs provided that support three modes, standard 2D video, 3D video using a 3D capable camera with a single video output or 3D video using two seperate video feeds from two cameras.
The video streams are fully user configurable to adjust size and position of the video to each eye.
There is an integrated headtracker interface that allows Rift's internal 1kHz head tracker to control a pan, tilt and roll of a camera via a PPM output.

The current Transporter3D has been tested with great success. No other FPV experience comes close to the feeling of actully being there, this is the experience provided by the Oculus Rift via the Transporter3D .

Featured Product

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

The ST Robotics Workspace Sentry robot and area safety system are based on a small module that sends an infrared beam across the workspace. If the user puts his hand (or any other object) in the workspace, the robot stops using programmable emergency deceleration. Each module has three beams at different angles and the distance a beam reaches is adjustable. Two or more modules can be daisy chained to watch a wider area. "A robot that is tuned to stop on impact may not be safe. Robots where the trip torque can be set at low thresholds are too slow for any practical industrial application. The best system is where the work area has proximity detectors so the robot stops before impact and that is the approach ST Robotics has taken," states President and CEO of ST Robotics David Sands.