AUVSI 2014 - IAI showing off unmanned maritime vessel

A manned/unmanned maritime combat vessel for homeland security and protection of offshore assets is being displayed in Florida next week by Israel Aerospace Industries. Read more: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Security-Industry/2014/05/08/IAI-showing-off-unmanned-maritime-vessel/1551399567117/#ixzz319nQFzaP

LOD, Israel, May 8 (UPI) --A dual-mode, manned/unmanned combat maritime vessel is being displayed in the United States next week by Israel Aerospace Industries.


The modular designed Katana, suitable for a range of homeland security applications and for protection of offshore assets, features autonomous navigation, collision avoidance, advanced control systems. It is equipped with various payloads, communication systems, radars and weapon systems.

"Based on IAI's extensive experience in converting existing vessels into USVs (unmanned surface vessels), Katana can be developed based on an existing platform or as a new one," IAI said. "Katana joins IAI's family of unmanned systems in space, the air, on land and at sea, enhancing customers' operational capabilities with entirely interoperable solutions."

The high-speed vessel can be operated remotely through an advanced command-and-control station.

Specifications of the vessel were not immediately available.

IAI will display the Katana at the AUVSI Unmanned Systems exhibition in Orlando, Fla., beginning May 13.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Security-Industry/2014/05/08/IAI-showing-off-unmanned-maritime-vessel/1551399567117/#ixzz319nTKLro

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