Schunk - Analog multi-positioning monitoring via teachable C-slot sensor

08-06-2014 - The analog SCHUNK MMS-A magnetic switch is the first teachable encoder which can be integrated directly into the C-slot of gripping modules free of interfering contours. It serves to accurately detect the size of the gripped parts which can be output as an analog voltage value as 0-5 V DC or 0-10 V DC, as selected, during the current handling process. Now the extremely compact MMS-A, with a 4 mm diameter, is sufficient where previously several magnetic switches were required.


The required electronics are already fully integrated. The output signal is sent over a displacement measuring range up to 30 mm with a resolution of up to 0.1 mm. Using an intuitive teaching function and two LEDs, different magnetic fields can be quickly and easily made linear. To ensure high repeat accuracy, the magnetic analog switch is specifically tailored to the relevant modules from the comprehensive SCHUNK standard program. Together with the SCHUNK FPS-F5 force sensor system controller, the encoder becomes a simple teachable multi-range sensor which can detect up to five teachable states. The MMS-A has a rugged housing for industrial use and meets protection class IP67. It can be flexibly integrated into systems via the cable outlet (30 cm, 100 cm). The operating voltage is between 15 V and 30 V.

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Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.