Microscan Hosts 3-Day Advanced Machine Vision Training Course

Microscan, a global technology leader in barcode, machine vision, and lighting solutions, announces a three-day training course on advanced machine vision tools taught through hands-on exercises using Microscans advanced Visionscape® Machine Vision Software platform.

Microscan, a global technology leader in barcode, machine vision, and lighting solutions, announces a three-day training course on advanced machine vision tools taught through hands-on exercises using Microscans advanced Visionscape® Machine Vision Software platform. The course will be held in Microscans Northeast Technology Center in Nashua, New Hampshire, from December 6-8, 2016 at 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM daily. Attendance is free and online registration is available for all users; recommended for those with intermediate to advanced experience with machine vision or programming.

While human inspectors on assembly lines visually inspect parts to judge the quality of workmanship, machine vision systems use cameras and image processing software to perform the same evaluations tirelessly and with greater precision. Machine vision inspection plays and important role in achieving 100% quality control in manufacturing, reducing costs, and ensuring a high level of customer satisfaction. Machine vision systems not only provide product tracking by way of barcodes and text to create traceable production histories, but can also guide products through automated operations, match products with labels and packaging, and compare product features to expected shapes, colors, fill levels, and sizes.
Part of Microscans Certified Training program, this three-day machine vision training course offers an in-depth study of Microscans complete machine vision tool library available in its advanced Visionscape® Machine Vision Software. Training will provide an overview of common machine vision applications with hands-on exercises setting up machine vision inspection tools and programming jobs to solve a range of tasks from basic barcode reading and text recognition to complex measurements, defect detection, and guidance. Attendees will learn to use tools like Decode, OCR, Count, Measure, OCV, Symbol Quality Verification, and more, as well as monitor results. Microscan machine vision technology experts will be available to offer one-on-one guidance on attendees specific applications and automation projects and attendees are invited to bring their parts or barcodes to the event to discuss with the Microscan team.
For additional training information or to request additional training, visit http://www.microscan.com/en-us/resources
About Microscan
Microscan is a global leader in barcode reading, machine vision, and verification technology serving a wide range of automation and OEM applications. Founded in 1982, Microscan has a strong history of technology innovation that includes the invention of the first laser diode barcode scanner and the 2D symbology, Data Matrix. Today, Microscan remains a leader in automatic identification and inspection with extensive solutions ranging from barcode reading, tracking, and traceability to complex machine vision measurement, guidance, barcode verification, and print quality grading.
As an ISO 9001:2008-certified company recognized for quality leadership in the U.S., Microscan is known and trusted by customers worldwide as a provider of quality, high-precision products. Microscan is a part of Spectris plc, the productivity-enhancing instrumentation and controls company.

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