Misty Robotics Raises $11.5 Million To Put Robots In Every Home

Alex Knapp for Forbes:  Toy startup Sphero has made a name for itself making connected toys, most famously their toy version of Star Wars' BB-8 droid. Now they're spinning out a new company, Misty Robotics, which has set forth the relatively modest goal of putting a robot in every home and office. And not just silent drones, either. Misty wants to build robots like R2-D2 or Rosie from The Jetsons - useful companions with personality.

Misty Robotics was cofounded by former Sphero CTO Ian Bernstein and serial entrepreneur Tim Enwall. On Tuesday, the company announced that it's closed a Series A funding round of $11.5 million. Sphero also holds a minority state in the company.

There are two key robotics approaches that the company believes distinguishes it from other ongoing companies. The first approach is building robots capable of doing more than one thing - it's not practical, Bernstein argues, to have a bunch of robots that only do one thing, like a robot to clean the gutters and another to clean the pool and another to vacuum the floor.

"Robots in the home need to be more multipurpose," he said. "Our big vision is like Rosie from The Jetsons - for robots to be present in our lives, cooking food, cleaning houses and doing all kinds of things."

To that end, Misty sees robots as platforms that other developers can use to be creative with potential robotics applications, like a smartphone or a PC.  Full Article:

Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

The ST Robotics Workspace Sentry robot and area safety system are based on a small module that sends an infrared beam across the workspace. If the user puts his hand (or any other object) in the workspace, the robot stops using programmable emergency deceleration. Each module has three beams at different angles and the distance a beam reaches is adjustable. Two or more modules can be daisy chained to watch a wider area. "A robot that is tuned to stop on impact may not be safe. Robots where the trip torque can be set at low thresholds are too slow for any practical industrial application. The best system is where the work area has proximity detectors so the robot stops before impact and that is the approach ST Robotics has taken," states President and CEO of ST Robotics David Sands.