The 2014 MATE competition highlights the role that ROVs play in exploring and documenting shipwrecks, studying sinkholes, and conserving our national maritime heritage sites.

National Robotics Week And MATE ROV Competition

L Hetherington for | RoboticsTomorrow

Last week was National Robotics Week. Along with other events, many regional teams competed to move forward in the 13th annual MATE underwater ROV competition:

A RUNDOWN FROM LAST YEARS EVENT:

 

The 2014 MATE competition highlights the role that ROVs play in exploring and documenting shipwrecks, studying sinkholes, and conserving our national maritime heritage sites.

The competition is divided into 4 classes that vary depending on the vehicle specs & complexity of the mission tasks:

  • EXPLORER (advanced)(vehicle demonstration required)1

  • RANGER (intermediate)(participation in regionals required, some exceptions) 1

  • NAVIGATOR (beginner/intermediate) 2

  • SCOUT (beginner)2


these classes participate in the international competition
these classes participate in the regional contests

 

The 13th annual MATE international competition will take place June 26-28, 2014 at the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in Alpena, MI, USA... (full schedule of regional and international events)

The content & opinions in this article are the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of RoboticsTomorrow

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