Microscan to Instruct Machine Vision Course at Upcoming Learning Labs

Microscan, a global technology leader in machine vision and barcode solutions, will present an educational machine vision workshop at the upcoming 2014 Anaheim Learning Labs Program, scheduled to take place February 11-13 in Anaheim, CA.

RENTON, WA, February 03, 2014 - Microscan, a global technology leader in machine vision and barcode solutions, will present an educational machine vision workshop at the upcoming 2014 Anaheim Learning Labs Program, scheduled to take place February 11-13 in Anaheim, CA. The session, "Technological Advances in Vision Precision," will be held in the Anaheim Convention Center on Thursday February 13, from 9:00 to 11:00 AM.


The Learning Labs are a new series of educational workshops set to take place alongside seven of the largest design and manufacturing expos in the U.S. The program has been designed to provide focused educational content and enable attendees to create a customized agenda tailored to their specific needs and interests. Microscan course instructor Dr. Jonathan Ludlow will discuss the applications of machine vision for verification during the presentation on Technological Advances in Vision Precision at 9:00AM on Thursday.

Legible, accurate barcodes and text are critical for automated supply chains, which depend on this data to ensure the reliable performance of their operations. Barcode verification with machine vision technology can easily ensure the quality, legibility, and accuracy of marked text and barcodes using simplified vision tools and software that are accessible to users of all experience levels. In addition to a review of machine vision smart cameras for inline verification of 1D and 2D barcodes, Dr. Ludlow will discuss format-checking and validation of auto ID and Human Readable label content using machine vision, and how to identify new machine vision tools for error-proofing packaging and package labels.

Dr. Ludlow, Microscan Machine Vision Promoter, has instructed machine vision technology courses for multiple years and brings more than 20 years of expertise in machine vision. He has authored papers on the application of machine vision in automated manufacturing environments such as semiconductor packaging and electronic assembly, holds several patents relating to inspection systems, and is a regular speaker at machine vision symposia.

Visit any of the seven expo websites for more information on the Learning Labs program: AeroCon West, ATX West, Electronics West, MD&M West, Pacific Design & Manufacturing West, PLASTEC West and WestPack. Use Discount Code DISCEXH when registering to receive 20% off standard conference rates. Learn more about machine vision and Microscan at www.microscan.com.

About Microscan

Microscan is a global leader in technology for precision data acquisition and control solutions serving a wide range of automation and OEM applications. Founded in 1982, Microscan has a strong history of technology innovation that includes the invention of the first laser diode barcode scanner and the 2D symbology, Data Matrix. Today, Microscan remains a technology leader in automatic identification and machine vision with extensive solutions for ID tracking, traceability and inspection ranging from basic barcode reading up to complex machine vision inspection, identification, and measurement.

As an ISO 9001:2008 certified company recognized for quality leadership in the U.S., Microscan is known and trusted by customers worldwide as a provider of quality, high precision products. Microscan is a Spectris company.

Microscan Contact
Corporate Headquarters, U.S.
Shelae Cheng, Marketing Communications Manager
+1 425-203-4927; scheng@microscan.com

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