Patti Engineering Supports Youth in Engineering at Michigan Future City Competition

LaPorte Home School of Clarkston, MI Earns "Best Use of Automation Technology" Award Sponsored by Patti Engineering

Auburn Hills, MI February 06, 2014


Patti Engineering, Inc., a leader in control systems integration, today announced its sponsorship of the Future City Competition for the fourth consecutive year. Organized by the Engineering Society of Detroit (ESD), the Michigan Regional Future City Competition is a program where sixth, seventh and eighth grade students, a teacher and volunteer mentors team up to design a city of the future. With this year's theme - Tomorrow's Transit: Design A Way To Move People In And Around Your City - each team's design focused on the transportation options and needs of their own city, and challenged students to create viable ideas that consider safety, accessibility, methodology, and sustainability in an effort to reimagine a better and more efficient city.

Patti Engineering sent a team of engineers to the ESD Michigan Regional Future City Competition on January 27 at Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi, MI, where they reviewed projects from teams who developed a plan and executed their designs with a budget of $100. Each team was responsible for conducting research and writing solutions to an engineering problem. Computer designs, essays, and narratives were submitted prior to the competition. At the event, each team displayed the physical model of their city and gave a presentation on their creation and ideas to a panel of judges.

Patti Engineering judges awarded the LaPorte Home School of Clarkston, MI the "Best Use of Automation Technology" award for their innovative use of the "Amazon" drone concept for all deliveries. This was to provide better traffic flow on their streets and allowed them to use less of their city land for roads. Michigan's first-place team, St. John Lutheran School of Rochester, MI, earned an all expense-paid trip for the teacher, mentor and three presenting students to Washington, DC, to compete in the finals February 15-18, 2014.

"The Future City Competition is an important educational tool for developing student interest in technology and engineering," said Sam Hoff, executive vice president of Patti Engineering. "We applaud the Engineering Society of Detroit's efforts to inspire the next generation of engineers. It is a great opportunity for us to give back to our community in a meaningful way."

About Patti Engineering, Inc.

Patti Engineering, Inc. is a CSIA Certified control systems integration company offering high-caliber engineering and software development services. Patti Engineering's technical expertise in electrical control and information systems provides turnkey control systems integration for design/build, upgrade/retrofit and asset/energy management projects. Industrial automation, production intelligence and shop floor IT solutions services include: project management, electrical engineering, hardware design, hardware procurement, software development, installation, calibration, start-up testing, verification, documentation, training and warranty support. Customer satisfaction and project success earned the company placement in the Control Engineering Magazine's Hall of Fame. For more information, visit http://www.pattieng.com.

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