STRATASYS RESELLER, R&D TECHNOLOGIES, NAMED THE FASTEST-GROWING TECHNOLOGY COMPANY IN RHODE ISLAND

R&D Technologies posted a 482 percent increase in sales for three consecutive years

Minneapolis & Rehovot, Israel - Jan. 14, 2015 - Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), a global leader of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, announced that its reseller R&D Technologies, has been named the fastest-growing technology company in Rhode Island by Providence Business News.


Led by the father and son team of CEO Andy Coutu and President Justin Coutu, R&D Technologies posted a 482 percent sales growth from 2011-13, giving it the top spot on Providence Business News' fastest-growing technology companies list. Providence Business News ranks companies in Rhode Island that demonstrate sales growth percentage for three consecutive years.

"We have experienced some remarkable growth over the past three years, both financially and as a team. As a reseller of Stratasys 3D Printers, we believe the future of additive manufacturing is limitless. We will continue to grow while supporting New England with its 3D printing needs," says Andy Coutu.

R&D Technologies sells the full line of Stratasys commercial 3D Printers, which includes FDM, PolyJet and WDM Technology. Adding to its success, R&D Technologies operates a prototyping service bureau and offers 3D CAD support.

"The impressive revenue growth for R&D Technologies within three years is quite an accomplishment," says Gilad Gans, President, Stratasys North America. "They are the only 3D printing reseller in Rhode Island, and we are proud to have them representing Stratasys."

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