Oak Ridge National Laboratory Unveils SOM-Designed 3D-Printed Building Powered by a Car

The mobile power source combined with the structure’s highly energy-efficient design and rooftop renewable energy photovoltaics showcase possibilities for future off-the-grid human shelter.

Oak Ridge, Tennessee, September 23

The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory today unveiled a 3D-printed building designed by the architecture, engineering and urban planning firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) in collaboration with ORNL researchers. The Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration features a building that is powered by a 3D-printed vehicle developed by ORNL.

The mobile power source combined with the structure's highly energy-efficient design and rooftop renewable energy photovoltaics showcase possibilities for future off-the-grid human shelter. The demonstration that was rolled out at DOE's inaugural Industry Day event is the result of a targeted collaboration between government and industry. Innovative rapid prototyping took the project from concept to completion in less than one year, involving the University of Tennessee (UT), Clayton Homes, General Electric, Alcoa, NanoPore and Tru-Design in addition to SOM.

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