DARPA's Low Cost Hand Hardware

The ARM-H track of DARPA's Autonomous Robotic Manipulation (ARM) program focuses on development of robust, low-cost and dexterous robotic hand hardware. DARPA funded performers to design and build hand mechanisms that could replace the claw-like hands currently used on robots with hands incorporating 3-4 fingers and useable palms. The teams successfully produced hands that can be manufactured for as little as $3,000 per unit (in batches of 1,000 or more), down from the $50,000 cost of current technology. The new hands also incorporate sufficient dexterity to enable manipulation of objects in their fingers when controlled by a skilled operator.

Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

Universal Robots Add a Sense of Touch in New e-Series Cobots with  Built-in Force/Torque Sensor and Re-Designed User Interface

Universal Robots Add a Sense of Touch in New e-Series Cobots with Built-in Force/Torque Sensor and Re-Designed User Interface

With the new e-Series cobot line, Universal Robots raises the bar for cobots, adding unique new features while significantly strengthening the four core principles defining collaborative robots: fast set-up, easy programming, flexible deployment, and safe operation. With a new built-in, tool-centric Force/Torque sensor the e-Series is ready to take on applications requiring force control right out of the box. A repeatability of 30 micron means the new cobots are suitable for very precise finishing, assembly and electronics tasks. A re-designed user interface decreases cognitive load and expedites program development, while a new externally accessible, 500Hz system bus enables more complex motion control algorithms or profiles.