Why CA Technologies is Moving into Collaborative Robotics

Chris Preimesberger for eWeek:  CA Technologies is adding collaborative robot research and development to its already-packed product dance card.

The New York-based company already has bustling businesses in mainframe software, automation, API distribution, security and several others. Nonetheless, on Jan. 17 CA revealed that it is moving to partner on something called cobotics--a collaborative robotics project--by working alongside Finland’s Tampere University of Technology and Finnish IT software and service company Tieto.

The project has been funded jointly by those three organizations along with Tekes, the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation.

A cobot or co-robot (from “collaborative robot”) is a robot intended to physically interact with humans in a shared workspace. This is in contrast with conventional robots, which are designed to operate autonomously or with limited guidance.

Cobots were invented in 1996 by J. Edward Colgate and Michael Peshkin, professors at Northwestern University. A 1997 U.S. patent filing describes cobots as "an apparatus and method for direct physical interaction between a person and a general purpose manipulator controlled by a computer."  Full Article:

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ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

The ST Robotics Workspace Sentry robot and area safety system are based on a small module that sends an infrared beam across the workspace. If the user puts his hand (or any other object) in the workspace, the robot stops using programmable emergency deceleration. Each module has three beams at different angles and the distance a beam reaches is adjustable. Two or more modules can be daisy chained to watch a wider area. "A robot that is tuned to stop on impact may not be safe. Robots where the trip torque can be set at low thresholds are too slow for any practical industrial application. The best system is where the work area has proximity detectors so the robot stops before impact and that is the approach ST Robotics has taken," states President and CEO of ST Robotics David Sands.