Why Robots Won't Kill Jobs: The World's Largest Robotics Company Says More Robots Means More Jobs

John Koetsier for Forbes:  93% of investors say that artificial intelligence is going to destroy jobs, and smart robots are putting 10.5 million U.S. jobs at risk, according to one report.

But a division president at perhaps the world's biggest robotics company says robots won't kill jobs.

In fact, just the opposite.

If robotics were going to kill jobs, Sami Atiya ought to know. He's the president of Robotics in Motion, a division of the $34.3 billion ABB Robotics. ABB has 135,000 employees in 53 countries, and an installed base of more than 70,000 control systems connecting 70 million devices, including 300,000 robots being used in factories all over the planet.

But Atiya says robots don't result in lower employment.

In fact, he says, the more robots a country has, the richer it gets.

"If you look at robot density around the world, it's about 40 robots for each 10,000 workers," Atiya told me recently via phone. "The more advanced countries, such as Germany, South Korea, and Japan have around 300 robots per 10,000 workers. Those three countries have the lowest unemployment rates."

And it's not just limited to those countries. The U.S. is doing better with robots too, he says.  Full Article:

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