U.S. Military To Keep Robotic Edge in Face of $400 Billion Cuts

U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense William Lynn said the U.S. will maintain its lead in unmanned robotic technology in the face of a $400 billion reduction in defense spending. "Robotics and unmanned technology is a key future" for the U.S. military, Lynn said in Paris today ahead of this year's Air Show. The Pentagon will also seek to maintain a lead in cyber security and the capability to strike long-range targets using a combination of missiles, aircraft and electronic attack, he said at briefing. The Pentagon is reviewing its long-range spending plans to meet President Barack Obama's goal of reducing spending over 12 years to help cut the U.S. deficit. Outgoing Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Leon Panetta, his successor, have said all defense programs are under review. "No country with a weak economy is going to be strong militarily," Lynn said. "So, it's a strategic imperative that we tackle the budget deficit" including ways to reduce defense spending. Still, there are some areas of emerging military strength the U.S. will try to preserve, including unmanned robotic technologies, because it's not clear "the exact shape they will take, or the precise advantages they will confer" Lynn said in prepared remarks that he plans to deliver at a dinner organized by the U.S. Aerospace Industries Association.

Health Robotics Reports Record Financial Results for FY2010 Driven by Winning 100% of Worldwide IV Robots' Purchases

TopCoder Community and Platform Power 2011 Zero Robotics SPHERES Competition for NASA & DARPA

Software Community Builds Competition Platform for High School Students Challenged to Conduct Experiments with Satellites Aboard the International Space Station

Topcon MS Robotic Series Opens New Era in Precision Measurements

The series can be used for large-scale 3D measurement applications and also has a 2D monitoring function for real-time two-dimensional projects.

Building a robotic future

Most of the machines that we use today are a part of the Robotic Technology that has encompassed our entire society and our lives. Yusra Husain explores

KUKA Robotics Showcases Innovative Robotic Solutions for the Packaging Industry at PACKEX 2011

KUKA Robotics Canada to demonstrate an innovative unified controlled palletizing solution, in addition to the LWR lightweight robotic technology, at PACKEX Toronto, Canada's most comprehensive resource for Packaging and Processing in booth #1113.

Topcon MS Robotic Series Opens New Era in Precision Measurements

"The MS 'measuring station' opens a new era in ultra-precision measurements"

Kinect Hackers Are Changing the Future of Robotics

For 25 years, the field of robotics has been bedeviled by a fundamental problem: If a robot is to move through the world, it needs to be able to create a map of its environment and understand its place within it. Roboticists have developed tools to accomplish this task, known as simultaneous localization and mapping, or SLAM. But the sensors required to build that map have traditionally been either expensive and bulky or cheap and inaccurate. On November 4, a solution was discovered-in a videogame. That's the day Microsoft released the Kinect for Xbox 360, a $150 add-on that allows players to direct the action in a game simply by moving their bodies. Most of the world focused on the controller-free interface, but roboticists saw something else entirely: an affordable, lightweight camera that could capture 3-D images in real time. Within weeks of the device's release, YouTube was filled with videos of Kinect-enabled robots. A group from UC Berkeley strapped a Kinect to a quadrotor-a small helicopter with four propellers-enabling it to fly autonomously around a room. A couple of students at the University of Bundeswehr Munich attached a Kinect to a robotic car and sent it through an obstacle course.

Kiva Systems Launches Robot Rental Program for Fulfillment Center Automation

Rental Option Offers Unparalleled Seasonal Flexibility to eCommerce Operations

KUKA Robotics Showcases Innovative Robotic Solutions for the Packaging Industry at PACKEX 2011

KUKA Robotics Canadato demonstrate an innovative unified controlled palletizing solution, in addition to the LWR lightweight robotic technology, at PACKEX Toronto, Canada's most comprehensive resource for Packaging and Processing in booth #1113.

Economic Conditions and Opportunities Bode Well for Robotics Market

A glance at the big picture for robotics reveals the world market has returned to growth after steep declines in 2009.

Japan's Decline as a Robotics Superpower: Lessons From Fukushima

Robots were a major force in the automation drive that made Japan the most competitive nation in manufacturing in the 1980s. That glory seems to have faded in recent decades, and Japanese robotics are no exception.

RoboBusiness Leadership Summit Registration Open

Executive-level conference to focus on cutting-edge technologies and commercialization strategies

Kiva Systems Launches Robot Rental Program for Fulfillment Center Automation

Rental option offers unparalleled seasonal flexibility to eCommerce operations

RoboBusiness Leadership Summit Registration Open

Executive-level conference to focus on cutting-edge technologies and commercialization strategies

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Industrial Robotics - Featured Product

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots - Collaborative Robot Solutions

Universal Robots is a result of many years of intensive research in robotics. The product portfolio includes the UR5 and UR10 models that handle payloads of up to 11.3 lbs. and 22.6 lbs. respectively. The six-axis robot arms weigh as little as 40 lbs. with reach capabilities of up to 51 inches. Repeatability of +/- .004" allows quick precision handling of even microscopically small parts. After initial risk assessment, the collaborative Universal Robots can operate alongside human operators without cumbersome and expensive safety guarding. This makes it simple and easy to move the light-weight robot around the production, addressing the needs of agile manufacturing even within small- and medium sized companies regarding automation as costly and complex. If the robots come into contact with an employee, the built-in force control limits the forces at contact, adhering to the current safety requirements on force and torque limitations. Intuitively programmed by non-technical users, the robot arms go from box to operation in less than an hour, and typically pay for themselves within 195 days. Since the first UR robot entered the market in 2009, the company has seen substantial growth with the robotic arms now being sold in more than 50 countries worldwide.