Here is a list of white papers. Please let us know if there is a white paper you would like to see that's not on the list. Just send us an email containing details about the white paper including Name, Publication Date, Contact Telephone, Email and URL if available.


Featured Factory Automation White Papers

HOW TO OPTIMIZE THE SCALABILITY & PERFORMANCE OF A MULTI-CORE OPERATING SYSTEM
Published by IntervalZero
THE BASICS OF HOW AN ENCODER WORKS
Published by Encoder Products Company

All Factory Automation White Papers

THE AUTOMATION IMPERATIVE

As many organizations move to build their automation capabilities, recent survey results suggest that certain best practices will differentiate successful efforts from others.

USB 3.0 – A COST EFFECTIVE HIGH BANDWIDTH SOLUTION FOR FPGA HOST INTERFACE

"With a theoretical bandwidth of up to 625MB/s, USB 3.0 (later renamed as USB 3.1 Gen 1) is definitely a leading contender for FPGA host interface. This large bandwidth and low latency can help improve FPGA based data acquisition systems, accelerated computing, and Test & Measurement while sticking to low BOM. Certain features available with off-the-shelf USB 3.0 solutions can offer sideband utilities such as FPGA configuration, board health monitoring with minimal added cost. This white paper is making a case for a complete FPGA host interface system using FTDI's USB 3.0 FIFO solutions."

HOW TO OPTIMIZE THE SCALABILITY & PERFORMANCE OF A MULTI-CORE OPERATING SYSTEM

When upgrading your hardware platform to a newer and more powerful CPU with more, faster cores, you expect the application to run faster. More cores should reduce the average CPU load and therefore reduce delays. In many cases, however, the application does not run faster and the CPU load is almost the same as for the older CPU. With high-end CPUs, you may even see interferences that break determinism. Why does this happen, and what can you do about it?

THE BASICS OF HOW AN ENCODER WORKS

An encoder is a sensing device that provides feedback from the physical world; that is, it converts motion to an electrical signal that can be read by some type of control device, such as a counter or PLC. The control device then uses that signal to control a conditional event, such as activating a print head to create a mark at a specific location, or positioning a joint correctly on an articulated robot limb.