Disney Research Papers On Robotics

Disney Research has published a bunch of papers related to robotics. Topics covered include biped robot to maintain balance and walk on a rolling ball, playing catch and juggling with a humanoid robot, siting and standing, and using a swarm of mobile illuminated robots to coordinate and form images.

Lehmann Aviation's LA100 UAV

Lehmann Aviation's LA100 is a fully autonomous UAV designed to capture 5 minutes of flight at the height of 80m-100m using a mounted GoPro camera. Camera can be mounted on the top of the wing for Oblique images (Hero, Hero2 or Hero3) or at the bottom of the wing for Vertical images (Hero3). You can also choose to fly with 2 cameras at the same time.

Noam Chomsky on Where Artificial Intelligence Went Wrong

Lengthy Atlantic interview with linguist Noam Chomsky on the state of AI and the use of statistical models. The interview can be read here and a detailed overview and reply by Director of Research at Google, Peter Norvig is here.

ST Robotics Offers 11-Axis Tandem Robot System for under $20,000

ST Robotics announced today the latest addition to their R12 robot product line, the Tandem R125, a low cost two-armed robot system. Including the programmable carousel, ST Robotics' Tandem R125 robot has a total of 11 axes. The entire system is available for less than $20,000 and includes everything to get up and running: the two R12 five-axis robot arms mounted on the carousel, two K11R controllers, RoboForth II software, intuitive teach pad, simple interfacing with other equipment, cables, manuals, a two-year warranty and unlimited free technical support.

The Inebriator

The Inebriator is a home made automated cocktail machine. The Inebriator is powered by an Arduino Mega 2560 Microprocessor Project Board. A Hitachi HD44780 compatible display is used to allow display drink information, coupled with a couple of buttons to navigate the menu. A stepper motor is used to drive the drinks shelf, with acceleration and deceleration to allow high speed without spilling. All mixers are in plastic bottles in a cool box, each bottle has two pipes, one that is hooked to the gas tank (70% Nitrogen and 30% Carbon Dioxide), and the other goes from the bottom of the bottle to a valve. When the gas tank is opened (through a regulator) the bottles are pressurised to a low safe pressure. When 12v is applied to the valve it opens, and the pressure causes the liquid to flow through the pipe and ultimately into the glass. Each mixer has its own valve and individually controllable.

Palm Sized Robot Dragonfly Up On Kickstarter-like Indiegogo

TechJect, a company formed from Georgia Tech's Robotics & Intelligent Machines Lab is looking for crowd funding of their robot dragon fly. They are looking for $110,000 and are currently at $73,000 with 54 days left so there is a good chance they will reach their goal. They are offering several different models of the dragonfly. The most basic $100 dollar model is sold out but you Delta Dragonfly for a $179 dollar donation or for $250 you can get one with WiFi and a camera. Check out their video below and their Indiegogo page for all the donation and models available.

Wired Editor Chris Anderson Leaves To Run 3D Robotics/DIY Drones

From Venture Beat:

Wired editor Chris Anderson is leaving the magazine after 11 years as its editor-in-chief to run a robotics company he founded, 3D Robotics.

Anderson made the announcement at an all-hands meeting for Wired staffers in San Francisco friday.
3D Robotics has a Facebook page, Twitter account, and domain name (3drobotics.com), but currently no website. Currently, that URL redirects to DIY Drones, another company Anderson founded, which sells kits and parts for people making their own unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) — robotic aircraft, essentially. It appears that 3D Robotics is an outgrowth of that company. (cont'd)

New DARPA's Pet-Proto Video

In this video, the Pet-Proto, a predecessor to DARPA's Atlas robot, is confronted with obstacles similar to those robots might face in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC). To maneuver over and around the obstacles, the robot exercises capabilities including autonomous decision-making, dismounted mobility and dexterity. The DARPA Robotics Challenge will test these and other capabilities in a series of tasks that will simulate conditions in a dangerous, degraded, human-engineered environment. Teams participating in Tracks B and C of the DRC will compete for access to a modified version of the Atlas robot for use in the 2013 and 2014 live disaster-response challenge events.

Last Nights Robot Hall of Fame Inducts NAO, PackBot, BigDog and WALL-E

The Robot Hall of Fame® inducted four robots chosen for the first time by a popular vote — Aldebaran Robotics' NAO humanoid, iRobot's PackBot bomb disposal robot, Boston Dynamics' four-legged BigDog and WALL-E, the fictional robot of the namesake Pixar movie — during a ceremony tonight at Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh.

"More than any previous class of inductees, this group of robots selected by popular vote represents contemporary robotics — robots at the cutting edge of technology — rather than older robots of strictly historical importance," said Shirley Saldamarco, Robot Hall of Fame director and a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center. "Two of our inductees, NAO and Packbot, are commercially available and BigDog is still the focus of active research. Even our fictional honoree, WALL-E, is from a movie that's just four years old."

More than 17,000 people across every continent except Antarctica participated in the online vote in August and September. The 12 nominees on this year's ballot were chosen by a group of 107 robotics experts, industry leaders and aficionados selected by the Robot Hall of Fame (RHOF).

The RHOF, created in 2003 by Carnegie Mellon University, recognizes excellence in robotics technology. It honors both the fictional robots that inspire innovation and the real robots that embody it. In 2009, it was integrated into Carnegie Science Center's roboworld™ exhibit.

The new inductees were elected in four categories: Education & Consumer; Entertainment; Industrial & Service; and Research.

NAO was inducted in the Education & Consumer category. An autonomous, programmable, humanoid robot developed by Aldebaran Robotics in 2006, the 22-inch-tall robot is used as an education platform and in the RoboCup robot soccer Standard Platform League. Other nominees in this category were iRobot's CREATE and the VEX Robotics Design System.

In the Entertainment category, voters chose WALL-E (Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth Class), the lovable star of the 2008 Disney/Pixar blockbuster by the same name. In the movie, WALL-E inadvertently embarks on a space journey that ultimately decides the fate of mankind. Other nominees in this category were Rosie the maid from the cartoon series "The Jetsons" and Johnny 5 from the 1986 movie "Short Circuit."

PackBot won in the Industrial & Service category. Created by iRobot, PackBot is one of the most successful battle-tested robots in the world. It performs bomb disposal and other dangerous missions for troops and first responders. More than 4,500 units are currently on station in Iraq and Afghanistan. It was one of the first robots to enter the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant after the 2011 tsunami. The other nominees were Kiva Systems' autonomous warehouse robots and the Jason submersible from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Finally, BigDog was recognized in the Research category. This dynamically stable quadruped robot was created in 2005 by Boston Dynamics. It can traverse difficult terrain and run at 4 miles an hour while carrying 340 pounds and climbing a 35-degree incline. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has sponsored its development as a robotic pack mule to accompany soldiers in terrain too tough for conventional vehicles. Other nominees were Willow Garage's two-armed PR2 mobile robot and NASA's Robonaut.

TurtleBot 2 Available For Preorder

What's new with Turtlebot 2.0?

Improved Performance
The new and improved Turtlebot includes a factory calibrated gyro with far better performance at low rotation speeds and encoders with 1000x better resolution.  The result is a low-cost mobile robot with impressive position and velocity feedback to enhance your autonomy, navigation and mapping.

Power-ups!
The new Turtlebot has many new power features to improve user experience.  We’ve included a 19V laptop power output to keep your laptop charged longer, we’ve added more user power connectors to power more sensors, and we’ve even added an extended life battery upgrade to maximize your uptime. 

Coming Soon - A docking station is in the works to enable auto-charge and 24/7 autonomy!

Now Shipping Worldwide
One of the biggest limitations of the old Turtlebot was that it was not RoHS compliant, meaning that we were unable to ship to certain countries.  We are very pleased to announce that the new TurtleBot is 100% RoHS compliant and ready to ship worldwide.  Now Turtlebot’s only language barrier is a binary serial protocol.

Available at Clearpath Robotics for $1,149.00 and shipping December 1st.

A Robotic Wheelchair Able To Climb Steps

A demo of Chiba Institute of Technology's wheel chair concept:

"If a sensor detects a step, the robot calculates whether it can lift that leg. It can't raise its wheels right away, so the steering system at the rear makes preparatory motions to gain stability. When the wheels can be raised stably, the robot lifts its legs."

IROS 2012 Videos

Robot locomotion with continuum limbs (courtesy of IEEE Spectrum):

 

RoboBee (courtesy of Harvard University and IEEE Spectrum):

 

Robot builds ramp by randomly flinging 3,600 toothpicks (courtesy of IEEE Spectrum):

 

People tracking on RGB-D people dataset (courtesy of IASLABResearch):

IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems

This week the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems is taking place Vila Moura, Algarve, Portugal. We'll be posting all the big news as it comes. The full IROS2012 schedule is available here.

Espresso Book Machine

The Espresso Book Machine makes a perfect-bound paperback book virtually identical to the publisher’s original in a matter of minutes. The user chooses a digital file via the EspressNet software system, either at the physical EBM, or remotely via the Internet (users can also bring their own files in person: on CD’s, flash drives, etc.). The EBM uses PDF files for the book block and the cover. A high-speed Xerox 4112 Copier/Printer prints the pages of the book – the book block. The printer uses standard US letter-size (8.5” x 11”) or A4 paper stock. A high-speed Xerox 4112 Copier/Printer prints the pages of the book – the book block. The printer uses standard US letter-size (8.5” x 11”) or A4 paper stock. A rotating wheel applies a thin layer of heat-activated glue over the milled edge. The clamp then moves the book block down to the cover, which waits on the binding table. The EBM uses special pneumatics and clamps to press the cover against the spine and around the book block. This produces a traditional “perfect-bound” book.

Human Support Robot From Toyota

Toyota Motor Corporation has developed a human support robot (HSR) prototype to assist independent home living for persons with limited arm or leg mobility. Aiming to improve quality of life, Toyota has developed the HSR prototype in cooperation with the Japan Service Dog Association to identify the needs and desires of individuals with limited limb mobility, and developed functions focused around picking up dropped objects, retrieving items, and communicating with family members and caregivers. In 2011, TMC conducted in-home trials using the robot with individuals with limb disabilities in cooperation with the Foundation for Yokohama Rehabilitation Service and incorporated user feedback into development.

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Industrial Robotics - Featured Product

Mitsubishi Electric Automation, Inc. - BEST INITIAL WARRANTY – 3 YEARS FOR ALL NEW REGISTERED ROBOTS

Mitsubishi Electric Automation, Inc. - BEST INITIAL WARRANTY - 3 YEARS FOR ALL NEW REGISTERED ROBOTS

Registering your Mitsubishi Electric Automation robot unlocks the full potential of Mitsubishi Electric Automation's industry-leading three year cleanroom or on-site service initial limited warranty for robots purchased on or after October 1, 2014.