How can industrial robots gain new abilities that can increase their operational value while remaining safe and secure in a factory collaborating with humans?

COMPUTER VISION AND ROBOTICS EXPAND INDUSTRIAL CAPABILITIES
COMPUTER VISION AND ROBOTICS EXPAND INDUSTRIAL CAPABILITIES

Case Study from | Wind River

Cobots, or collaborative robots, are a new step in industrial robot technology. Unlike most robots, which act as replacements for human workers, cobots are designed to collaboratively work side-by-side with their human counterparts.  How can industrial robots gain new abilities that can increase their operational value while remaining safe and secure in a factory collaborating with humans? One way to increase robotic abilities in a safe and efficient manner is to use an innovative new technology: computer vision.

 

Computer vision technology enables a robot to use a camera or scanner to transform multidimensional inputs into data it can process, “perceiving” its surroundings and mimicking sight. Computer vision coupled with machine learning and/or artificial intelligence gives the robot or cobot increased technical abilities and the opportunity to perform more complex tasks. This data can be communicated rapidly via 5G technology to speed data to enable fast actions to enable safe interactions and reactions to the surroundings and humans working close by.

 

To learn how computer vision is allowing “cobots” to work securely, safely and innovatively with human workers, read this Wind River use case, “Computer Vision and Robotics Expand Industrial Capabilities”.

The content & opinions in this article are the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of RoboticsTomorrow

Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

ST Robotics Develops the Workspace Sentry for Collaborative Robotics

The ST Robotics Workspace Sentry robot and area safety system are based on a small module that sends an infrared beam across the workspace. If the user puts his hand (or any other object) in the workspace, the robot stops using programmable emergency deceleration. Each module has three beams at different angles and the distance a beam reaches is adjustable. Two or more modules can be daisy chained to watch a wider area. "A robot that is tuned to stop on impact may not be safe. Robots where the trip torque can be set at low thresholds are too slow for any practical industrial application. The best system is where the work area has proximity detectors so the robot stops before impact and that is the approach ST Robotics has taken," states President and CEO of ST Robotics David Sands.