Watch these robotic 'reindeer' from Boston Dynamics pull Santa's sleigh

By Lulu Chang for Digital Trends:  We’re going to rewrite Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, because now, it’s robotic dogs that are pulling Santa’s sleigh. In a rather frightening video, Google-owned robotics design firm Boston Dynamics has shown us the future of Christmas, and it’s plenty progressive, complete with machines and female Santas. I can get behind that sort of holiday, I think. Of course, the Internet wasn’t so sure. And to be fair, the dog-like robots are a bit frightening. Large and, well, headless, these machines seem to hearken more to the Thestrals (the skeletal winged horses visible only to those who’ve witnessed death) of Harry Potter’s universe than the adorable reindeer that are supposed to transport jolly Saint Nick to and from the North Pole.

2016 Will Be A Pivotal Year For Social Robots

There really is an unusual affinity for human-like robotic things - which is why so much money is flowing to adapt these new social robots to quickly speak Chinese and Japanese in addition to English and to provide localized apps for their software stores.

Three Heavily Funded Robotic Arms Projects on Kickstarter

Well over a million dollars pledged for these projects.

Mecklermedia To Liquidate; Plans To Sell Assets

Mecklermedia Inc. (OTC: MECK), an operator of trade shows for the 3D Printing, Robotics and Bitcoin industries, announced today that the company has adopted a plan of liquidation and dissolution and intends to suspend its operations upon stockholder approval of the plan of liquidation and dissolution.

Three Startups Make an Impression at Robotics Alley

The 2015 Robotics Alley Conference & Expo played host to the first annual "Invest in Innovation" competition earlier this month, where three technology startups made an impression on both the judges and the attendees.

ARxIUM Selects Additional Distributors of RIVA Automated Compounding System for Asia-Pacific Region

Distributors to meet growing demand for safe and efficient IV medication compounding

CES 16 - Robotics Marketplace At CES® 2016 Sees Huge Growth & Expansion

The Robotics Marketplace at CES 2016 will see a whopping 71 percent growth in exhibit space over CES 2015.

Google to incubate its robotics and drone divisions under Google X

By Mike Wheatley for SiliconAngle:  Google is planning an organizational reshuffle that will see its secretive robotics department and drone business folded into its Google X labs. Google’s robotics division, and the drone group it created when it acquired Titan Aerospace in 2014, will both fall under the Google X umbrella when the reshuffle takes place some time next year, Re/Code reported. Google X is the secretive part of Google that develops some of its most futuristic, bleeding edge technologies. These include its famous self-driving cars, Project Loon (Wi-Fi hot air balloons), and its airborne wind turbines. Google X operates as a standalone company under Google’s parent Alphabet Inc., which was created following Google’s corporate restructuring earlier this year. Google X’s projects are largely experimental and extremely uncertain in terms of a business model. Nevertheless, Google obviously deems it the best place to be for its robotics division, which has been left leaderless ever since Andy Rubin quit the Web giant last year. Previously, there was speculation that the robotics division may become a standalone company under Alphabet, but today’s news would indicate that’s not going to happen any time soon.   Cont'd...

2016 RBR50 Nominations Now Open

THE MOST INFLUENTIAL COMPANIES IN THE GLOBAL ROBOTICS INDUSTRY

RoboUniverse San Diego 2015

If you really want to see what imagination and a bit of opportunity can do for an industry I urge you to attend one of these Expos. You won't regret it and you might even come away with a new and unique solution to something you need.

Four Market Forces That Will Shape Robotics Over The Next Year

Richard Mahoney for TechCrunch:  As 2016 approaches, robotics is poised to traverse from a narrow set of industrial and military use cases to broader market applications that include commercial drones, telepresence robots, delivery robots and, of course, mobile vacuum cleaners. But, are robots ready to be a part of our daily life? Gill Pratt, a visionary who served as a program manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and oversaw the DARPA Robotics Challenge, postulated earlier this year that robotics might soon be headed for a “Cambrian Explosion.” The term refers to a period of time roughly half a billion years ago when the numbers and diversity of animals became critical to evolution.  Pratt offered that technology developments are ushering in a similar upsurge in the diversification and applicability of robotics.   Cont'd...

Robots to Reside in more than 1 in 10 American Households by 2020, Finds Juniper Research

Convenience Trumps Compromise, With AI Improving Slowly

Advanced Robotics: Meet Milo, an Intelligent Robot That is Really Good at Teaching Children with Autism Social Skills

Milo is an advanced social robot that uses children's voices developed by Acapela Group to help children with autism strengthen their communication skills.

HRI Case Study of Wireless Control: 5D Robotics

When you're building something for the military to use, you have to be sure it can survive the toughest working conditions.

Panasonic Introduced Its Tomato-picking Robot and Parallel Link Robot at International Robot Exhibition 2015

This robot will autonomously deliver items to destinations.

Records 1456 to 1470 of 2411

First | Previous | Next | Last

Featured Product

 Discover the power of Omron mobile robotics.

Discover the power of Omron mobile robotics.

Our fully autonomous intelligent vehicles will help you to transform the way you move materials and route your workflows. Increase throughput, eliminate material flow errors, improve traceability, maximize flexibility and allow your employees to focus on higher level tasks. Unlike traditional AGV's, our mobile robotics navigate using the natural features of your facility and do not require expensive facility modifications or guidance. Our AIV's can adapt to changes in their environment and work freely and safely with your staff. Our mobile robots are intelligent enough to quickly learn their environment and then automatically find the optimal path to where they need to go. They also automatically make adjust for dynamic environments and can work together in fleets of up to 100 robots.