The US service-sector jobs at risk from a robot revolution

Sam Fleming for Financial Times:  When Andy Puzder, chief executive of restaurant chains Carl’s Jr and Hardee’s, said in March that rising employment costs could drive the spread of automation in the fast-food sector, he tapped into a growing anxiety in the US. From touchscreen ordering systems to burger-flipping robots and self-driving trucks, automation is stalking an increasing number of professions in the country’s service sector, which employs the vast majority of the workforce. Two-fifths of US employees are in occupations where at least half their time is spent doing activities that could be automated by adapting technology already available, according to research from the McKinsey Global Institute. These include the three biggest occupations in the country: retail salespeople, store cashiers and workers preparing and serving food, collectively totalling well over 10m people. Yet evidence of human obsolescence is conspicuous by its absence in the US’s economic statistics. The country is in the midst of its longest private-sector hiring spree on record, adding 14.4m jobs over 73 straight months, and productivity grew only 1.4 per cent a year from 2007 to 2014, compared with 2.2 per cent from 1953 to 2007. Those three big occupations all grew 1-3 per cent from 2014 to 2015.  Cont'd...

Robots Helping Grads Get Jobs

Not many students can claim they have hands-on experience with automation and robotics going into an interview. Looking at the question with a macro lens, our students are offered job opportunities on being well-rounded, even at the sophomore-level when many accept summer/semester-long internships.

Republican-Leaning Cities Are At Greater Risk Of Job Automation

By Jed Kolko for Five Thirty Eight:  More and more work activities and even entire jobs are at risk of beingautomated by algorithms, computers and robots, raising concerns that more and more humans will be put out of work. The fear of automation is widespread — President Obama cited it as the No. 1 reason Americans feel anxious about the economy in his State of the Union address last month — but its effects are not equally distributed, creating challenges for workers and policymakers. An analysis of where jobs are most likely to face automation shows that areas that voted Republican in the last presidential election are more at risk, suggesting that automation could become a partisan issue. So-called “routine” jobs — those that “can be accomplished by following explicit rules” — are most at risk of automation. These include both “manual” routine occupations, such as metalworkers and truck drivers, and “cognitive” routine occupations, such as cashiers and customer service reps.1 Whereas many routine jobs tend to be middle-wage, non-routine jobs include both higher-wage managerial and professional occupations and lower-wage service jobs.   Cont'd...

Where are the Top Robotics Employers?

The below table shows the location, the number jobs & the key employers. We only searched for jobs that had "Robotics" in the job title.

Myth Busting: Greater Manufacturing Automation Doesn't Mean Fewer Jobs

When it comes to addressing manufacturing labor challenges, companies shouldn't be quick to assume that job opportunities will decrease as a result of an increase in automated systems.

Adept Technology Hires Vice President of North American Sales for Fixed Robotics

"Brian McMorris brings to Adept more than 20 years of experience in the automation industry, successfully cultivating companies' sales and distribution teams, developing strategic marketing plans, and consistently exceeding revenue goals"

Bishop-Wisecarver Group Announces Drew Leppert as Director of Sales, Distribution

Prior to BWG, Drew served in numerous sales management roles with Honeywell, Intl for a decade.

Adept Technology Adds New Distributor

HTE Technologies Will Market and Support Adept Robots in Missouri, Kansas and Southern Illinois

Adept Technology Adds New Distributor

Applied Controls Will Market and Support Adept Robots in U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region

The 7 Best Cities For Robotics Right Now

RoboUniverse, robotics’ annual meeting of the minds, is rolling out in New York City this week—and in the keynote address today, we learned where the best robotics work in the world is happening. In it, he shared a list of world cities that are pretty much killing it in the robotics sphere. The innovation centers are, in no particular order: 1.  Boston 2.  Pittsburgh 3.  San Jose/San Francisco (Silicon Valley) 4.  Tokyo 5.  Osaka 6.  Seoul 7.  Munich What determined this list? Kara said that robot innovation centers all share proximity to “excellent universities,” and regularly contribute to robotics R&D. It’s also hard to deny each location’s contributions to robotics so far: Silicon Valley and Tokyo are gimmes, but not everyone might be aware of the others.

Robotics Engineers: What are the salary levels & who is hiring?

The below salary charts for robotics engineers shows the highest salary levels for robotics engineers in New York & San Francisco at approx. $110,000.

Automating Jobs: The Driverless Car Will Have Some Ugly Side Effects

During the ten years between 2020 and 2030, we're going to have our first experience with human-free businesses where systems/software will be communicating/negotiating with each other and you'll just be sitting on the sideline.

Changing Automation with Sensitive Robots

Critics of automation claim robots are out to replace people. The near future will show that people are definitely in control and will be able to leverage technology for greater profitability and professional satisfaction.

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